Home

Plants

Tree of Life

ID
  
 
Healthy Home Gardening
 
Golden Silk Orb-Weaver
Nephilidae
Nephila clavipes
Type: Arachnid
gardengeek
gardengeek

Compare Species
?

Nephilidae
Spinning Spiders
Araneoidea
8-Eyed
Entelegynae
Genital Plate
Araneoclada
Araneomorphae
Araneae
Spiders
Arachnida
Arachnida
Arachnids
Chelicerata
Arthropoda
Jointed Feet
Ecdysozoa
Molting
Protostomia
Mouth First
Bilateria
Two-Way Symmetry
Eumetazoa
True Higher Animals
Animalia
Animals
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


Nephilidae Family
Nephila Genus


Location / Where this Creature is found:

Franco da Rocha, Sao Paulo, Brazil.

General information about Golden Silk Orb-Weaver :

Named for the color of the web, not the spider.

The female is much larger than the male.

The web can reach one meter wide

After mating, the female spins an egg sac on a tree, laying hundreds of eggs in one sac.

The spider will only bite if pinched.
The bite causes local pain, redness, and blisters that normally disappear within a 24-hour interval.
This single thread has a tensile that exceeds that of steel by a factor of six.

The silk of N. clavipes has recently been used to help in mammalian neuronal regeneration.

Nephila is derived from Ancient Greek, meaning "fond of spinning".
AKA: golden orb-weavers, giant wood spiders, writing spiders , or banana spiders.

Nephila spiders are the oldest surviving genus of spiders, with a fossilized specimen known from 165 million years ago.

The orb is renewed regularly if not daily, apparently because the stickiness of the orb declines with age.

Golden Orb Weavers are known to occasionally eat prey as big as small birds.

young spiders demonstrate vibrational motion when approached by a predator.

Some nests near fruits may repel or destroy known pests, such as Tephritid fruit flies, without the need to use insecticides.
Fishermen on coasts of the indopacific ocean remove Nephila webs and form them into a ball, which is thrown into the water. There it unfolds and is used to catch bait fish.
In 2004 a textile designer, Simon Peers, and an entrepreneur, Nicholas Godley managed in three years work and using 1.2 million Golden silk orb-weavers to produce a shawl that was as exhibited at the American Museum of Natural History in 2009.





Golden Silk Orb-Weaver - YouTube.com


Golden Silk Orb-Weaver




Golden Silk Orb-Weaver




Golden Silk Orb-Weaver




Golden Silk Orb-Weaver




Golden Silk Orb-Weaver




Golden Silk Orb-Weaver




Golden Silk Orb-Weaver




Golden Silk Orb-Weaver




Golden Silk Orb-Weaver


Comment: Golden Silk Orb-Weaver

Phylogenetic Tree of Life

Learn how to create a custom
Tree of Life





© Copyright 2006 - 2017 HealthyHomeGardening.com.
All Rights Reserved.
Web Design by Artatom