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Healthy Home Gardening

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Healthy Home Gardening



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gardengeek
gardengeek
Snot-nose
  Snot-nose February 03, 2009
These seemingly adorable little neighborhood primates can become quite a burden for the rural gardener. Sometimes this species can find a home next door. The symptoms are usually balls and toys that come flying over as a prelude to a clumsy, clomping, snot-nose jumping right into your freshly transplanted seedlings. In their larval stage, they are harmless but if these creatures are over-coddled, they can develop into Snot-noses, or worse; the infamous Snot-nosed Brat. Throughout his Snot-nose
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gardengeek
gardengeek
Black Widow
  Black Widow March 13, 2009
Latrodectus Hesperus, the Western black widow spider or Western widow, is a species of venomous spider found western regions of the United States of America. The female's body is 1416 millimetres in length, the male is around half this size, and is black; often with an hourglass shaped red mark on the lower abdomen. The population was previously described as a subspecies of Latrodectus Mactans and it is closely related to the northern species Latrodectus variolus. The biggest threat the Black Black Widow
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gardengeek
gardengeek
Aphids
  Aphids March 13, 2009
Aphids, also known as plant lice (and in Britain as greenflies),[1] are small plant-eating insects, and members of the superfamily Aphidoidea.[2] Aphids are among the most destructive insect pests on cultivated plants in temperate regions.[3] The damage they do to plants has made them enemies of farmers and gardeners the world over, but from a purely zoological standpoint they are a fascinating and very successful group of animals.[4] About 4,400 species of 10 families are known. Historically Aphids
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gardengeek
gardengeek
Red Spider Mite, Two-Spotted Spider Mite
  Red Spider Mite, Two-Spotted Spider Mite March 13, 2009
The Red Spider Mite is barely visible with the naked eye, but it can be seen. You would need a magnefying glass to really see one and identify it. Hot, dry conditions are often the cause of spider mite infestations. The Spider Mite is like the Thrips in that they both consume the chlorophyll from the leaves of the plant, cell by cell by sucking it out. And like the Thrips, the spider mite attacks in numbers, thousands of spider mites can all easily be fou Red Spider Mite, Two-Spotted Spider Mite
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fadinha
fadinha
Grasshoppers
  Grasshoppers March 14, 2009
About 30 grasshopper species are considered garden pests. They wreak the most havoc in the middle of the country. Like many pests, grasshopper populations rise and fall. In peak years, grasshoppers eat all the plants they encounter, wiping out entire gardens and fields. Initial signs of feeding by young grasshoppers are jagged and tattered holes chewed in leaves. Grasshoppers have long narrow bodies, with long angled back legs suited to jumping, and a head featuring large eyes and chewing mou Grasshoppers
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Deer
  Deer March 14, 2009
Deer generally feed in forests and on wild grasses, but when food runs out, they venture out onto the fringes - suburban neighborhoods on the fringe of rural areas - to find food. Once they find food, they tend to return on a regular basis, usually in the evening. Unchecked populations of deer are an increasing problem for gardeners throughout the country. If you want to limit deer damage, start early. Barriers such as electric fencing and tall barrier fences have proven to provide Deer
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Squirrels
  Squirrels March 14, 2009
Squirrels aren't picky. They'll show up in your garden and have a feeding frenzy on your seedlings, berries, fruit, vegetables - even roots and bark. Sometimes they'll attack your larger flowers and will dig up bulbs and newly planted seeds. You`re more likely to encounter squirrels if you leave near fields or wild land. In the spring and summer, you'll see most squirrels active in mid-morning or late afternoon. This pest causes problems by: Humm almost everything How to get rid of it Squirrels
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fadinha_green
fadinha_green
Mealybugs
  Mealybugs March 14, 2009
If your plants leaves are yellowing and you see dark, dirty patches, you may have a mealybug problem. There are several species of mealybug that may cause you and your garden problems. These tiny insects appear in clusters on the undersides of leaves and clumped on in the forks of twigs and branches where they suck plant juices. As they feed, some species inject toxins that damage plant tissues. They're oval in shape, with a grainy, dusty surface that is actually a protective waxy coati Mealybugs
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Earwigs
  Earwigs March 14, 2009
If your flower petals or soft vegetables are getting munched up, the culprit could be earwigs, which are found all over the United States. When earwigs show up in large numbers, they can inflict substantial damage in your garden. Like many other pests, they do their destruction at night, hiding out during the day, even under the watchful eyes of garden gnomes This pest causes problems by: These reddish-brown nocturnal creatures feed primarily on all things soft in the garden, including dec Earwigs
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Aphids
  Aphids March 14, 2009
If you see soft, oval-shaped insects that hang out together on the buds of your rose bushes, then chances are you have aphids. These insects come in an interesting range of colors, including green, pink, red, and black. Some have wings, some don't. Aphids have a tendency to curl leaves around themselves and take cover in protected parts of the plant. Many other creatures in your garden will take care of your aphid problem. Lacewings, ladybird beetles, syrphid flies, predatory midges, wasps Aphids
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Rabbits
  Rabbits March 14, 2009
Despite being so adorable-looking, rabbits aren't all that sweet and innocent. Once plants grow beyond the seedling stage - or trees develop tough bark - they are generally safe from bunny attacks. Rabbits generally leave clean-cut leaves and stems, unlike other pests who aren't quite as tidy in their attacks. This pest causes problems by: These furry guys can cause considerable damage in the garden, munching on peas, beans, lettuce, flowers, tulips, clover and deciduous tree bark. Rabbits
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Mites
  Mites March 14, 2009
If little dots or clusters of yellow show up on your otherwise green plants, then you may have unwelcome visitors - mites. Mites look like little tiny specks of color - yellow, red, or green. They are related to the spider, having eight legs. Because the yellowing of leaves is a common problem, you'll want to test to see if mites are the culprit. To do this, hold a piece of white paper beneath the stipled leaves, then shake the stem. If you do indeed have mites, some will fall onto the paper Mites
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fadinha_green
fadinha_green
Slugs and Snails
  Slugs and Snails March 14, 2009
Slugs and snails are two of the most aggressive garden pests around - and they always return, no matter what measures you take. The two creatures are similar; snails have a shell, slugs don't. Slugs and snails always seem to return, whether it`s from other lots, on new plants or from new soil in container plants you purchase from the nursery, appearing as eggs in tiny round clusters. This pest causes problems by: They attack a range of plants, leaving irregular-shaped holes in leaves Slugs and Snails
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Thrips
  Thrips March 14, 2009
If you notice leaves that appear to shrink and curl up, you may have thrips, tiny little pests that scrape tissue from your flowers and leaves and then drink the plant juices. If you get a lot of thrips in one place, flowers and leaves won't open normally and they'll look twisted or stuck together. You'll also notice small black fecal pellets that thrips deposit when they feed. Thrips usually appear in May, but in desert areas in can be as early as March. They breed quickly, so as the season Thrips
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lorincook
lorincook
Aphids, Mealy
  Aphids, Mealy March 20, 2009
Aphids can be a serious pest by weakening your plants and introducing viruses. Try planting Marigolds or Tagetes amongst the crop. They attract beneficial insects like hover flies and lady birds which feed on the aphids and will help reduce the infestation - yet another aspect of learning how to grow Brussel Sprouts and other garden vegetables is to understand how nature can be used to benefit your environment. Spraying is the only way to have a real impact on badly infested plants. Spray with Aphids, Mealy
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artatom200
artatom200
Aphids
  Aphids March 25, 2009
This is a plant destroyer, that attacks types of Plants, including Broccoli, and Brussel Sprouts. I think aphids suck, the life out of your plants. Aphids
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Jorge2009
Jorge2009
Alfalfa Plant Bug
  Alfalfa Plant Bug March 29, 2009
Adelphocoris lineolatus, the Alfalfa Plant Bug, is about 7-9 mm long and 3 mm wide. These plant bugs are found in fields and other grassy areas, and tend to be attracted to lights such as porch and street lights. The adults can be seen between May and late October, ranging from Southern Ontario and the northeastern United States south to North Carolina west to Colorado. Adelphocoris lineolatus is an introduced species to Eurasia, but the date of introduction is currently unknown. This pest cause Alfalfa Plant Bug
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heidbenati
heidbenati
Blue Jay
  Blue Jay April 01, 2009
The Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) is a passerine bird, and a member of the family Corvidae native to North America. It belongs to the "blue" or American jays, which are, among the Corvidae, not closely related to other jays. It is adaptable, aggressive and omnivorous, and has been colonizing new habitat for many decades. Its food is sought both on the ground and in trees and includes virtually all known types of plant and animal sources, such as acorns and beech mast, weed Blue Jay
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Amanda
Amanda
Starlings
  Starlings April 02, 2009
Starlings have diverse and complex vocalizations, and have been known to imbed sounds from their surroundings into their own calls, including car alarms, and human speech patterns. The birds can recognize particular individuals by their calls, and are currently the subject of research into the evolution of human language. Starlings are small to medium-sized passerine birds in the family Sturnidae. The name "Sturnidae" comes from the Latin word for Starling, sturnus. Plu Starlings
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Leslie
Leslie
Pigeons
  Pigeons April 03, 2009
Pigeons have been falsely associated with the spread of human diseases. Contact with pigeon droppings poses a minor risk of contracting histoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, and psittacosis. Pigeons are not a major concern in the spread of West Nile virus; though they can contract it, they do not appear to be able to transmit it. Pigeons are, however, at potential risk for carrying and spreading avian influenza. Although one study has shown that adult pigeons are not clinically susceptible to the most Pigeons
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Leslie
Leslie
House Sparrow
  House Sparrow April 03, 2009
The "true sparrows", the Old World sparrows in the family Passeridae, are small passerine birds. As eight or more species nest in or near buildings, and the House Sparrow and Eurasian Tree Sparrow in particular inhabit cities in large numbers, sparrows may be the most familiar of all wild birds. Generally, sparrows tend to be small, plump brown-grey birds with short tails and stubby, powerful beaks. The differences between sparrow species can be subtle. They are primarily seed-eater House Sparrow
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Jorge2009
Jorge2009
Araneus Spiders - Orbweavers
  Araneus Spiders - Orbweavers April 03, 2009
The orb-weaver spiders (family Araneidae) are the builders of spiral wheel-shaped webs often found in gardens, fields and forests. Their common name is taken from the round shape of this typical web. Orb-weavers have eight similar eyes, legs hairy or spiny and no stridulating organs. The family is cosmopolitan, including many well-known large or brightly colored garden spiders. There are more than 2,800 species in over 160 genera worldwide, making this the third largest family of spiders known ( Araneus Spiders - Orbweavers
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Amanda
Amanda
Crab spider
  Crab spider April 03, 2009
Crab spiders make up the Thomisidae family of the Araneae order. They are called crab spiders because they resemble crabs, with two front pairs of legs angled outward and bodies that are flattened and often angular. Also, like crabs, Thomisidae can move sideways or backward. Crab spiders do not build webs to trap prey, but are hunters and ambushers. Some species sit on or among flowers, bark, fruit or leaves where they grab visiting insects. Individuals of some species, such as Misumena vati Crab spider
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Amanda
Amanda
Wolf spiders
  Wolf spiders April 03, 2009
Wolf spiders are members of the family Lycosidae. They are robust and agile hunters, and have good eyesight. They live mostly solitary lives and hunt alone. Some are opportunistic wanderer hunters, pouncing upon prey as they find it or chasing it over short distances. Others lie in wait for passing prey, often from or near the mouth of a burrow. Like all species, wolf spiders have a primitive body structure, with a head used mainly for eating and breathing, and an abdomen, which carries all t Wolf spiders
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gardengeek
gardengeek
Yellow Sac Spider
  Yellow Sac Spider April 10, 2009
They have 8 eyes, 4 in a row on the top of their cephalothorax, and 4 in a row below. They are attracted to heat, and will often be seen hanging and climbing around lights left on at night. This pest causes problems by: People don't like spiders. They assume all of them are dangerous or pests, but some just eat house bugs. How to get rid of it: Get rid of the bugs they are eating in your house. Keep your windows sealed during spring and fall, especially basement windows. Yellow Sac Spider
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gardengeek
gardengeek
 Funnel Weaver Spider
  Funnel Weaver Spider April 10, 2009
Also Known as the grass spider, and the Bora Spider. A very common house spider in the midwest United States. This spider is a close relative to the wolf spider. This spider is harmless. You will see these in the corners of stairs, and basements. This spider builds a little funnel nest to attract small prey, this spider is extremely fast. This pest causes problems by: It makes webs in the house and outside, some people think they are poisonous, but they aren't. How to get rid of it: Keep your  Funnel Weaver Spider
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gardengeek
gardengeek
Cellar Spider
  Cellar Spider April 10, 2009
Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Arachnida Order: Araneae Suborder: Araneomorphae Superfamily: Pholcoidea Family: Pholcidae Also known as: Daddy long-legs spider, Vibrating spider, and House spider. Commonly confused with the deadly Brown Recluse (Violin Spider), or the Desert Loxoceles, because of the violin shaped markings on it's cephalothorax. It is very small, even under a magnifying glass, it looks as though it has two eyes, but they are actually two groupi Cellar Spider
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artatom100
artatom100
Thrips, Thunderflies, Thunderbugs, Storm Flies, Corn Lice
  Thrips, Thunderflies, Thunderbugs, Storm Flies, Corn Lice April 20, 2009
A Thrips is a very small bug that can just barely be seen by the naked eye. Some may have wings and some may not. Thrips reproduce rapidly. They thrive in small, tight places. The thrips uses it's adapted mandible to pierce the cell walls of the plant and consume the chlorophyll inside. This takes all of the green out of the leaf leaving it silvery white. Plants that are damaged by thrips can't be fixed, so as the thrips attack, it becomes harder for the plant to absorb energy from s Thrips, Thunderflies, Thunderbugs, Storm Flies, Corn Lice
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gardengeek
gardengeek
Potato Bug - Woodlouse
  Potato Bug - Woodlouse April 21, 2009
Common names for Woodlouse include: Armadillo bug, Cheeselog, Doodlebug, Pill bug, Roly-poly, Potato bug, Sow bug, Roll up bug, Chuggypig, Slater, and Gramersow. The Potato bug or Woodlouse is a crustacean with a rigid, segmented, long exoskeleton and fourteen jointed limbs. There are over 3,000 known species of Woodlice. Woodlice in the genus Armadillidium can roll up into an almost perfect sphere as a defensive mechanism, hence some of the common names such as pill bug or roly-po Potato Bug - Woodlouse
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artatom100
artatom100
Cricket
  Cricket April 21, 2009
This pest causes problems by: How to get rid of it: Cricket
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