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Healthy Home Gardening

Blossom End Rot


Plant Disease Type:

Unknown
Unknown
This disease attacks:
Blossom-end rot is a serious disorder of tomato, pepper, and eggplant
Blossom End Rot
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Thunder
Thunder


General Information about Blossom End Rot :
On tomato and eggplant, blossom-end rot usually begins as a small water-soaked area at the blossom end of the fruit (Figure 1). This may appear while the fruit is green or during ripening. As the lesion develops, it enlarges, becomes sunken and turns black and leathery. In severe cases, it may completely cover the lower half of the fruit, becoming flat or concave

Blossom-end rot is not caused by a parasitic organism but is a physiologic disorder associated with a low concentration of calcium in the fruit. Calcium is required in relatively large concentrations for normal cell growth. When a rapidly growing fruit is deprived of necessary calcium, the tissues break down, leaving the characteristic dry, sunken lesion at the blossom end.

This plant disease can commonly be found in these places:
In the garden

How to get rid of or kill this disease:
Management

Maintain the soil pH around 6.5. Liming will supply calcium and will increase the ratio of calcium ions to other competitive ions in the soil.

Use nitrate nitrogen as the fertilizer nitrogen source. Ammoniacal nitrogen may increase blossom-end rot as excess ammonium ions reduce calcium uptake. Avoid over-fertilization as side dressings during early fruiting, especially with ammoniacal forms of nitrogen.

Avoid drought stress and wide fluctuations in soil moisture by using mulches and/or irrigation. Plants generally need about one inch of moisture per week from rain or irrigation for proper growth and development.

Foliar applications of calcium, which are often advocated, are of little value because of poor absorption and movement to fruit where it is needed

Comment: Blossom End Rot

Page Posts: 5

Thunder
Thunder

There is the info that will help IF it is blossom end rot...but if there is a critter involved ("I saw a little organism more than an ant") then none of these solutions will help!
August 18, 2010
21:04:59
Thunder
Thunder

Blossom end rot is caused by calcium deficiency. While this may be a result of low calcium levels in the soil, more often it is the result of erratic watering. When the plant is allowed to get too dry, or given too much water over a period of time, its ability to absorb calcium from the soil is diminished. If your soil is low in calcium (as determined by a soil test) the easiest solution is to add lime several times per year, according to the directions on your soil test results. If the issue is erratic moisture, here are some tips:

1.Pay closer attention to watering. If blossom end rot has been an issue, try to make sure that your soil isn't allowed to dry out. The best defense against blossom end rot is a nice, consistent soil moisture level.

2.Mulch. By adding a three-inch layer of organic mulch, you can help maintain adequate soil moisture levels, even during dry spells. It is best to add the mulch after your soil has warmed in the spring; adding it too early can result in your soil staying cold longer than it should.

3.Plant susceptible crops (such as tomatoes, melons, squash, peppers, and eggplants) in well-draining, deep soil that has been amended with compost or well-rotted manure. Soil amended with plenty of organic matter will retain moisture better and supply plenty of nutrition (including calcium) to your plants.

Types of Garden Lime

Agricultural Lime or Garden Lime

Agricultural Lime or Garden Lime is made from pulverized limestone or chalk. As well as raising the pH it will provide calcium for the crops and trace nutrients. Some recent experiments are indicating our soils may well benefit from the addition of rock dust, adding trace nutrients to the soil.

Dolomite Lime

Dolomite lime is similar to garden lime but contains a higher percentage of magnesium.

Quicklime and Slaked Lime

Quicklime is produced by burning rock limestone in kilns. It is highly caustic and cannot be applied directly to the soil. Quicklime reacts with water to produce slaked, or hydrated, lime, thus quicklime is spread around the land in heaps to absorb rain and form slaked lime, which is then spread on the soil. Their use is prohibited by the organic standards and while fast acting, the effect is short lived in comparison to garden lime.

Liming while plants are growing may harm those plants, so wait until after the garden season. It is best to add garden lime in the fall and let it break down over the winter. Planting two to three months later will allow the soil pH to adjust.

August 18, 2010
21:02:51

Edwin Soto

Comerio,Puert
o Rico

I got another one more today like this.Can you explain me what is liming and how to do it? What can I use for the liming process? If there is a commercial product to do it?Thanks.
August 18, 2010
16:47:49
gardengeek
gardengeek

Edwin, can you get a picture? it's probably larvae from an insect, that was eating it. Blossom End Rot is a deficiency of calcium.

http://plantclinic.cornell.edu/FactSheets/blossomrot/blossomrot.htm
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/pp/notes/oldnotes/vg19.htm
August 18, 2010
08:46:08

Edwin Soto

Comerio,Puert
o Rico

This what happen to my tomatoes but when i open it I saw a little organism more than an ant,they looks like a lice.Does they are part of this symptom.What could be?
August 18, 2010
02:22:54

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