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Campanulaceae
The Bellflower Family
Plantae
This plant family contains mostly perennial plants, although some are annual or biennial, but hardly any shrubs. Plants of this family are found in most parts of the world except Africa, although the majority are found in the temperate regions. The flowers are most usually blue. The family includes Campanulas, Symphyandra, Edraianthus, and almost all are grown for ornament. They may be several feet tall, or only a few inches.

Blue (or white) bell-shaped flowers
Lots of small seeds

http://theseedsite.co.uk/campanulaceae.html

Scientific Family name.
Hint: Usually ends in "acea"
Full Family List


The Family Campanulaceae
belongs to the Order of Asterales


Main Diagram | Plant Order List


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Campanulaceae
Asterales
Asterales
Star Order (Daisies)
Euasterids II
Euasterids II
Real Stars Group Two
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


Wild Campanula
Wild Campanula
Campanula
forager - July 21, 2012

Campanula portenschlagiana
Campanula portenschlagiana
C. portenschlagiana
davidberkeley - April 25, 2012

Serbian Bellflower
Serbian Bellflower
campanula poscharskyana
cynthialou587 - September 25, 2010

Bellflower
Bellflower
Campanula rotundifolia
Thunder - July 09, 2010

White Lobelia
White Lobelia
Lobelia
gardengeek - June 25, 2010

Throatwort
Throatwort
Trachelium caeruleum
Thunder - June 17, 2010

Cardinal Flower
Cardinal Flower
Lobelia cardinalis
Thunder - June 15, 2010

Campanula
Campanula

terrahbell - May 07, 2010

Star of Bethlehem
Star of Bethlehem
Hippobroma longiflora
heidbenati - February 15, 2010

Star of Bethlehem
Star of Bethlehem
Hippobroma longiflora
gardengeek - December 29, 2009

Peach-leaved Bellflower - Persicifolia Blue
Peach-leaved Bellflower - Persicifolia Blue
Campanula persicifolia
gardengeek - May 29, 2009

Bellflower (punctata shown)
Bellflower (punctata shown)
Campanula
DrPerry - May 18, 2009

Lobelia (siphilitica shown)
Lobelia (siphilitica shown)
Lobelia
DrPerry - May 18, 2009

Lobelia Flower
Lobelia Flower
Lobelia
gardengeek - May 10, 2009


http://theseedsite.co.uk/campanulaceae.html


If you see any missing information, you can post it below.

Comment: Lobelia Flower

Page Posts: 2

tobolonoble
tobolonoble
May 11, 2009
In the 1800's lobelia was prescribed to induce vomiting in order remove toxins from the body. Because of this, it earned the name "puke weed."
Today, lobelia is considered effective in helping clear mucus from the respiratory tract, including the throat, lungs, and bronchial tubes.

Lobeline,is an active ingredient in the plant that stimulates nerves in the central nervous system - much like that of nicotine. Lobeline is similar to nicotine in its effect on the body. It was used as a nicotine substitute in many anti-smoking products designed to break the smoking habit. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) prohibited the sale of lobeline-containing smoking products in 1993. The FDA reported that such products lacked effectiveness in helping people quit or reduce smoking.

Lobelia can be safely used in very sal doses (particularly homeopathc doses), but is, however, important to note that lobelia is a potentially toxic herb where even moderate and larger amounts can cause adverse effects ranging from dry mouth and nausea to convulsions and even coma.
tobolonoble
tobolonoble
May 11, 2009
Botanical name:* Lobelia inflata
Lobelia grows throughout North America. The leaves are primarily used in herbal medicine. It was used to treat coughs and spasms in the lungs, as well as spasms elsewhere in the body, including the intestines and ureters (tubes connecting kidney to the bladder).
Lobelia was also considered a useful pain reliever and in higher amounts was used to induce vomiting in people who had been poisoned.

Lobelia has been used in connection with the following conditions (refer to the individual health concern for complete information):
Asthma
Bronchitis
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
Cough
Smoking cessation



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