Home

Plants

Tree of Life

ID
  
 
Healthy Home Gardening
 
Meadow Buttercup
Ranunculaceae
Ranunculus Acris


jamills
jamills
Flower Petal # 7+
Main Color    
Color 2    

Ranunculaceae Family

Ranunculus Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Double Creeping Buttercup


Location

found in the perennial garden at my new home

Physical Description
After letting this plant grow for a year in my garden - creeping does not begin to describe it - it is a long distance sprinter. Clearly, unless you want your entire yard covered in this plant in one short year, you will not want to think of this as anything other than a weed! <note added 1 AUG 2010>
this plant reminds me of some sort of parsley leaf; in the spring it gets tall (10-12 inch) spindly stems with vivid bright yellow flowers. the flowers are about 1/2-inch in diameter and maybe 1/4-3/8 inch thick; the petals are numerous and closely packed; the petals are very glossy and almost look plastic; each plant seem to only get a couple of the flower stems from my limited (one spring) experiences; it spreads by very thick runners which have new plants on them about every 12-14 inches....maybe the leaves also remind me a bit of a very thick strawberry relative (but I am sure it's not) - no fruit or seed seems to occur on the flowers.


Compare Species
?

Ranunculaceae
Ranunculaceae
Ranunculales
Ranunculales
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

i remember this plant growing in an empty lot near my childhood home and it always fascinated me; for years I've searched for it; now, here in my new home's perennial bed several of them have shown up. sorry I don't have an image of the actual flower as I didn't think to take one this spring when it was blooming.



Bright Yellow Button Flower in Spring
Image from: http://www.andrewspink.nl/ranunculus/926.JPG (credit for the photo belongs to him - not me)



Bright Yellow Button Flower in Spring - Flower
Cluster of leaves; note runner on upper left of image



Bright Yellow Button Flower in Spring - Flower
Plant showing a runner heading off to the left. near the upper right you can see the structure of the leaf stems coming directly from the roots. There are two small plants in this image (not counting the runner\'s plantlets). Leaves on the right edge are from a clump of Lemon Balm.

  Identifier Research
Meadow Buttercup
,
May 06, 2010
Ranunculaceae
Ranunculus Acris
Web | Images | YouTube
Cultivar: Flore-pleno



Comment: Meadow Buttercup, Ranunculus Acris

Page Posts: 10


patti

Deltona, FL July 30, 2010
Did you ever find out what this flower/plant is called? My mother and grandmother had them in their gardens. Mom said she didn't know what they were but laughed and said, maybe it's a weed. I don't think they are but one never knows. I too would like to know what they are.
jamills
jamills
October 22, 2009
Kept looking and low and behold I found an image of the flower!
You can see it at:
www.andrewspink.nl ranunculus 926.JPG
It is under his listing for Ranunculus acris - but this one picture does not match the other image in that category. I've written to him for clarification...but perhaps viewing this image will help someone identify my plant in case I don't hear back from that webpage's author.
jamills
jamills
October 22, 2009
Also - just looked at all the pictures I could find of the buttercups...all have very few petals...this has a large number (as mentioned before - maybe as many as 50-60) - all off the petals are almost round in shape. and the largest (at the base of the flower) are maybe 3 16 of an inch in diameter while the top center of the flower has petals as small as 1 16 of an inch - which each "row" of petals slightly larger than the one below it. The petals are sort of like concentric circles which overlap each other with the petals on each layer slightly offset from the one below and above it.
jamills
jamills
October 22, 2009
Just looked up Ranunculus in Google... the plant I have does not have a tuber. And the petals seem much smaller than any pictured on the pages I looked at. Also, the petals come out from the center in a very flat manner - not like the one's I saw on the Ranunculus pages...those seem to rise up in a cup-like fashion around the center of the flower.

Jamills

Galion, Ohio, USA October 22, 2009
The description you posted is interesting, but as I said it has many more petals than 5 - maybe as many as 50-60...very shiny, almost polished in appearance. The entire flower is only about 1/2 to 3/4 inch in diameter on a long stem above the plant. But from your description of the leaves, it sounds like a similar plant.....but certainly not the one you mention because of the number of petals on the flower. Also, as someone earlier noted, it does not have a carrot-like root...sort of roots like many other garden plants - just a bunch of somewhat fibrous, easy to pull roots. Has sent out some runners this past summer - each runner has gotten about a foot long before setting down a new plantlet, much like a strawberry (or at least the wild strawberries in the same garden. The garden it is in has had many "old" varieties of perennials typical of a garden established in the 40's or thereabouts - which is the time-frame of the house. Thanks to all who havve responded...but AI think the search continues!
Chris2002
Chris2002
October 22, 2009
Creeping Buttercup
Scientific Name: Ranunculus repens
Other names: Creeping Meadow Buttercup, Devilís Guts, Granny Threads, Ramís Claws, Sitfast, Tether-toad
Family: Ranunculaceae
Perennial spreading by seed and long branching stolons which root at nodes along their length, forming new plants; one plant can spread over a 4m2 area in a year. The seed can remain in the soil for many years and germinate after cultivation. This is usually about 5 to 7 years, viability reduces to about 50% after 20 years, but viable seed have been recovered after up to 80 years (it is easy to believe the latter figure!).
A problem in lawns as it forms a rosette with the growing point at soil level, so it resists mowing and can also tolerate a great deal of trampling. Plants buried during cultivation soon regrow from great depths and re-establish on the surface, but repeated disturbance in hot weather will reduce the numbers.
Grazing animals can suffer from pain and inflammation leading to diarrhoea caused by a toxin in the fresh plant, but it becomes denatured in dry material so is not a problem in fodder. It is thought to deplete Potassium in the soil, so having a detrimental effect on surrounding plants (allelopathic). The leaves have three leaflets, each of which is lobed and as they mature they develop paler patches. This helps to distinguish them from similar looking leaves of ornamental plants such as Hardy Geraniums. The centre leaflet has a short stalk.
The bright yellow flowers have five shiny petals and occur singly on a grooved stalk from May to August. Fowering and seeding are more prevelant in dry conditions, in wet conditions the stolons are more plentiful.
Often the white, waxy mass of Root Aphids can be found at the base of the plants, but they don't seem to do much damage.

Height - up to 30 cm on open ground.

Dig out, clearing all of the runners; the white, fibrous adventitious roots do not regrow, but ensure that the growing point is removed. Cutting at an angle under the rosette will sever the tenacious roots and it is easily removed. Rake up the creeping stems before mowing so that they can be cut and so reduce its spread. They prefer the moist conditions of clay soils, so improving drainage.
Weedkillers to use:-
Glyphosate, systemic action killing the whole plant. Apply as spot weeder in the lawn. Treat the whole lawn with a selective weedkiller on its own ( eg. Verdone Extra) or a weed-and-feed type, it will probably take two or three applications to eradicate it because of the reservoir of seed and more mature plants may recover.

See also Meadow Buttercup which is similar.

Chris2002
Chris2002
October 20, 2009
Is it maybe a wild buttercup? They grow in fields, under trees, sun, etc.
jamills
jamills
July 28, 2009
the flowers themselves are exceptionally waxy glossy; each individual petal is like a tiny circle (about 1 16-1 8 inch depending on how lose to the edge they are. they overlap heavliy and number perhaps 50-75 tiny petals in each closely packed button-like flower. the yellow color is vivid - much like a deep coreopsis yellow - not at all a lemon yellow. each tiny round petal is very flat and combine in the button shape like almost a hemispherical button - looked at sideways I'd say it's almost a full half of a ball.
jamills
jamills
July 26, 2009
It's not at all an umbrella type of flower - just a small round tight button of petals...much like a large crysanthemum has a "bunch" of petals all in a ball - but, of course, no where near that size - the "button" is about 1 2-inch in diameter and rather thick.
gardengeek
gardengeek
July 26, 2009
Does it have an 'umbrel' of flowers, or an umbrella-like group of flowers? If you type "carrot" in the search above, you will find plants that have umbrels, if it does, it's most likely a member of the Celery Parsnip family, Apiaceae.

Look for Meadow Buttercup on:
Google: Meadow Buttercup Wikipedia: Meadow Buttercup YouTube: Meadow Buttercup
Phylogenetic Tree of Life

Learn how to create a custom
Tree of Life





© Copyright 2006 - 2020 HealthyHomeGardening.com.
All Rights Reserved.
Web Design by Artatom