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Healthy Home Gardening

Purple/Red Bromeliad

Bromeliaceae

heidbenati
heidbenati
Flower Info: Petal # 7+
Color 1    
Color 2    
Type Categories Useful Parts
None
None
Weed

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Purple/Red Bromeliad

Main Order Diagram | Plant Order List

Bromeliaceae Family
Queens-Tears Bromeliad Earth Star Dark Pink Bromelia Light Pink Bromelia Bromeliad growing on tree Bromelia on Tree Red Pink Bromeliad Pineapple Bromelia Flower

Seed
Seedling
Leaf
Stem
Flower
Fruit
NOT SET NOT SET Purple/Red Bromeliad Leaf Purple/Red Bromeliad Stem Purple/Red Bromeliad Flower NOT SET

Location

Brazil - Hopi Hari

Physical Description
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Purple/Red Bromeliad

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What's This?

Bromeliaceae
Poales
Poales
Commelinidae
Monocots
Monocots
One First-Leaves (Monocots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus
General Information

Bromeliads are one of the more recent plant groups to have emerged. The greatest number of primitive species reside in the Andean highlands of South America suggesting a beginning there. The west African species Pitcairnia feliciana is the only bromeliad not endemic to the Americas, and is thought to have reached Africa via long-distance dispersal approximately 12 million years ago.

Humans have been using bromeliads for thousands of years. The Incas, Aztecs, Maya and others used them for food, protection, fiber and ceremony, just as they are still used today. European interest began when Spanish conquistadors returned with pineapple, which became so popular as an exotic food that the image of the pineapple was adapted into European art and sculpture. In 1776, the species Guzmania lingulata was introduced to Europe, causing a sensation among gardeners unfamiliar to such a plant. In 1828, Aechmea fasciata was brought to Europe, followed by Vriesea splendens in 1840. These transplants were successful enough that they are still among the most widely grown bromeliad varieties.

In the 1800s breeders in Belgium, France and the Netherlands started hybridizing plants for wholesale trade. Many exotic varieties were produced up until World War I, which halted breeding programs and led to the loss of some species. The plants experienced a resurgence of popularity after World War II. Since then, Dutch, Belgian and North American nurseries have largely expanded bromeliad production.

Unknown Red Bromeliad

Unknown Red Bromeliad
Unknown Red Bromeliad - October 12, 2009

Unknown Red Bromeliad

Unknown Red Bromeliad
Unknown Red Bromeliad - October 12, 2009

Unknown Red Bromeliad

Unknown Red Bromeliad
Unknown Red Bromeliad - October 12, 2009

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