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Japanese Persimmon
Ebenaceae
Diospyros kaki


gardengeek
gardengeek
Flower Petal # 4
Main Color    
Color 2    
Type Categories Useful Parts

Tree




Ebenaceae Family

Diospyros Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Shizi, Asian Persimmon, Sharon Fruit, Korean mango


Location

Grocery Store in Utah.

Physical Description
Persimmons are generally light yellow-orange to dark red-orange in color, and depending on the species, vary in size from 1.5-9 cm (0.5-4 in) diameter, and may be spherical, acorn-, or pumpkin-shaped.




Japanese Persimmon, Diospyros kaki - YouTube.com

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Ebenaceae
Ericales
Ericales
Erica Order (Heathers)
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
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Spermatophytes
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Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
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Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

A persimmon, known to the ancient Greeks as "the fruit of the gods" is the edible fruit of a number of species of trees of the genus Diospyros in the ebony wood family (Ebenaceae). The word persimmon is derived from putchamin, pasiminan, or pessamin, from Powhatan, an Algonquian language (related to Blackfoot, Cree and Mohican) of the eastern United States, meaning "a dry fruit".
Although its first published botanical decription was not until 1780,[1] the kaki is also among the oldest plants in cultivation, known for its use in China for more than 2000 years.
The calyx often remains attached to the fruit after harvesting, but becomes easier to remove as it ripens. They are high in glucose, with a balanced protein profile, and possess various medicinal and chemical uses. While the persimmon fruit is not considered a "common berry" it is in fact a "true berry" by definition.
Ethnomedical uses
* In traditional Chinese medicine the fruit is thought to regulate ch'i

* The raw fruit is used to treat constipation and hemorrhoids, and to stop bleeding. As such, it is not a good idea to consume too many persimmons at once as they can induce diarrhea

* The cooked fruit is used to treat diarrhea and dysentery

* The apparent contradictory effect of the raw and cooked fruit is due to its osmotic effect in the raw fruit sugar (causing diarrhea), and the high tannin content of the cooked fruit helping with diarrhea.

Medical precaution
Unripened persimmons contain the soluble tannin shibuol, which, upon contact with a weak acid, polymerizes in the stomach and forms a gluey coagulum that can affix with other stomach matter. The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy notes that consumption of persimmons has been known to cause bezoars that require surgery in over 90% of cases. More than 85% phytobezoars are caused by ingestion of unripened persimmons. Persimmon bezoars often occur in epidemics in regions where the fruit is grown.
Horses may develop a taste for the fruit growing on a tree in their pasture and overindulge also, making them quite ill. It is often advised that persimmons should not be eaten with crab meat, nor should they be eaten on an empty stomach.
It is said that one can predict the winter by taking the seeds out of some persimmons and then slicing the seeds. The shape that shows up the most inside each seed will indicate what kind of winter to expect. The three shapes resemble three eating utensils.
A Knife shape means there will be a cold icy winter (as in the wind will slice through you like a knife).

A Spoon shape means there will be plenty of snow to shovel.

A Fork shape means there will be a mild winter.



Japanese Persimmon
Japanese Persimmon - November 16, 2009



Japanese Persimmon
Japanese Persimmon - November 16, 2009



Japanese Persimmon
Japanese Persimmon - November 16, 2009

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