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Mango Tree
Anacardiaceae
Mangifera indica


gardengeek
gardengeek
Flower Petal # 7+
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Tree


Anacardiaceae Family

Mangifera Genus

Location

The mango is indigenous to India. This one was found in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

Physical Description
The leaves are evergreen, alternate, simple, 1535 cm long and 616 cm broad; when the leaves are young they are orange-pink, rapidly changing to a dark glossy red, then dark green as they mature. The flowers are produced in terminal panicles 1040 cm long; each flower is small and white with five petals 510 mm long, with a mild sweet odor suggestive of lily of the valley. The fruit takes from three to six months to ripen.


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Anacardiaceae
Sapindales
Sapindales
Soapberry Order
Eumalvids
Real Mallows
Malvidae
Mallow Class
Eurosids
Real Rose Class
Rosids
Rosids
Rose-Like Class
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Mango is now cultivated as a fruit tree in frost-free tropical and warmer subtropical climates like the Indian subcontinent; nearly half of the world's mangoes are cultivated in India alone.

A ripe mango is generally sweet, although the taste varies from variety to variety. The texture of the flesh varies between cultivars, some having a soft, pulpy texture similar to an over-ripe plum, while others have firmer flesh like a cantaloupe or avocado. In some cultivars, the flesh has a fibrous texture. Mango is consumed both as ripe fruit and as raw fruit (vegetable). In the raw form and in pickle form, the skin of mango is consumed comfortably whereas in fruits, the skin gets thicker and bitter and is usually not eaten. The ripe mango is commonly eaten fresh.

Mango is rich in a variety of phytochemicals[8] and nutrients. The fruit pulp is high in prebiotic dietary fiber, vitamin C, polyphenols and provitamin A carotenoids.[9]

Mango contains essential vitamins and dietary minerals. The antioxidant vitamins A, C and E comprise 25%, 76% and 9% of the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) in a 165 g serving. Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine, 11% DRI), vitamin K (9% DRI), other B vitamins and essential nutrients such as potassium, copper and 17 amino acids are at good levels. Mango peel and pulp contain other phytonutrients, such as the pigment antioxidants - carotenoids and polyphenols - and omega-3 and -6 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

Mango peel contains pigments that may have antioxidant properties, including carotenoids, such as the provitamin A compound, beta-carotene, lutein and alpha-carotene, polyphenols such as quercetin, kaempferol, gallic acid, caffeic acid, catechins, tannins, and the unique mango xanthone, mangiferin, any of which may counteract free radicals in various disease mechanisms as revealed in preliminary research. Contents of these phytochemicals and nutrients appear to vary across different mango species. Up to 25 different carotenoids have been isolated from mango pulp, the densest content for which was beta-carotene accounting for the yellow-orange pigmentation of most mango species. Peel and leaves also have significant content of polyphenols, including xanthones, mangiferin and gallic acid.

Related to Poison Oak:

Mango peel contains urushiol, the chemical in poison ivy and poison sumac that can cause urushiol-induced contact dermatitis in susceptible people. Cross-reactions between mango contact allergens and urushiol have been observed. Those with a history of poison ivy or poison oak may be most at risk for an allergic reaction to mango skin. This compound is also present in mango leaves and vines. During mango's primary season, it is the most common source of plant dermatitis in Hawaii.

The English word mango comes from the Portuguese manga, which is probably derived from the Malayalam മാങ്ങ (māṅṅa) (pronounced "manga"), from the Tamil mānkāy, from mān "mango tree" + kāy "fruit". The word's first recorded attestation in a European language was a text by Ludovico di Varthema in Italian in 1510, as Manga; the first recorded occurrences in languages such as French and post-classical Latin appear to be translations from this Italian text. The origin of the -o ending in English is unclear.




Mango Tree




Mango Tree




Mango Tree




Mango Tree




Mango Tree
Mango Tree - January 06, 2010



Mango Tree
Mango Tree - January 06, 2010



Mango Tree
Mango Tree - January 06, 2010

Comment: Mango Tree, Mangifera indica

Page Posts: 3


Gloria Twumasi

Ghana September 26, 2010
i asked of a labelled diagram of Mangifera indica(mango) but the diagrams given were not labelled. Not only that but other plants too,i suggest diagrams should be well labelled.

saadet

pakistan May 05, 2010

Jag

winnetka,ca February 03, 2010
I got this mango tree from a local store its about 4ft tall, the tree it self is ok but the spot where the new leaves are suppose to be growing is kind of dead dried up. my question is should i return it or shoud i cut of the dried spot and let new branches grow????

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