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Fennel

Apiaceae Foeniculum vulgare

lorincook
lorincook
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Fennel

Main Order Diagram | Plant Order List

Apiaceae Family
Sweet Cecily Meadow Parsnip Poison Hemlock Cumin  Dropwort Wild Parsnip Snow on the Mountain Queen Anne's Lace looks like a fern Fennel

Foeniculum Genus
Fennel Fennel

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Apiaceae
Apiales
Apiales
Api Order (Carrot)
Euasterids II
Euasterids II
Real Stars Group Two
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus
General Information

Foeniculum is a genus of fewer than half a dozen species, in the family Apiaceae (Umbelliferae).

It is best known for Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), treated by some botanists as the sole species in the genus. The name of the genus is derived from Latin feniculum, fśniculum, diminutive of fenum, fśnum, "hay".

With its umbrels of tiny yellow flowers and dark green or bronze wispy leaves, fennel is a decorative addition to the herbaceous border where it makes a good background plant. Be warned, however, that many other plants dislike fennel and grow poorly when forced to share space with this strong herb. Never plant fennel near coriander or dill.
Cultivation

Fennel will grow in most any soil, but the richer the soil, the more tender the foliage. Seeds should be sown directly in the garden in the late spring. Seedlings do not transplant well. The deep taproots are difficult to pull up, so remove unwanted seedlings while young. The plant will self-sow generously. To maintain a continuous supply of fresh leaves throughout the season, sow a few seeds every 10 days. If seeds are not desired, remove flowerheads to promote bushier growth. Fennel can be grown as an annual, although the established roots will overwinter easily. Divide roots in fall after the seeds have been harvested.

Culinary Uses

Use the leaves with pork, veal and fish. They are also good in fish stock, sauces and stuffings, and in mayonnaise, flavored butters and salad dressings. The dried stalks are placed under grilled or barbecued fish. The seeds are used as a spice, particularly in breads. At the two-leafed stage, the seedlings make a pungent salad, reminiscent of mustard.

Medicinal Use

A tea made with a few fresh sprigs of fennel or a level teaspoon of seeds will relieve indigestion. An infusion of the seeds is an excellent carminative, especially for babies. Use 1 teaspoon (5ml) of infusion for colic and gas.

Fennel is an effective treatment for respiratory congestion and is a common ingredient in cough remedies. A tea made from fennel helps to stimulate the flow of breast milk. It is sometimes added to baby formula to aid digestion. An infusion makes a soothing eyewash.

Other Uses

Chew the seeds as a breath freshener.
• Fennel seeds don't come from bulb fennel but from common, or wild, fennel. The seeds are slightly nutty, with the expected licorice flavor, and are widely used in sausages, stews, soups, and curries.

• Fennel stalks can take the place of celery in soups and stews, and can be used as a "bed" for roasted chicken and meats.

• Use fronds as a garnish, or chop them and use as you would other herbs, like dill or parsley. Chopped fennel works especially well in Italian tomato sauces, but add it late in the cooking process so the flavor isn't diluted.

Bulb Basics

• Trim the stalks about an inch above the bulb.

• If you want pieces to stay together for grilling, keep the root end intact. Otherwise, trim about a half inch off the root end before cooking.

• To slice fennel, stand the bulb on the root end and cut vertically.

Thanks to Kris Wetherbee for this information.

Fennel

Fennel
Fennel - September 21, 2009

Fennel

Fennel
Fennel - September 21, 2009

Fennel

Fennel
Fennel - September 21, 2009

Fennel

Fennel
Close up of a Fennel flower forming

Fennel

Fennel
close up of Fennel leaves

Fennel

Fennel
this fennel is going to seed....extending upward

Fennel - Plant

Fennel - Plant
Fennel - Plant - May 11, 2009

Fennel - Plant

Fennel - Plant
Fennel - Plant - May 11, 2009

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