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Tulip Poplar
Magnoliaceae
Liriodendron tulipifera


Thunder
Thunder
Flower Petal # 6
Main Color    
Color 2    
Type Categories Useful Parts

Tree




Magnoliaceae Family

Liriodendron Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Yellow-Poplar, Tulip Magnolia, Tulip Tree, Whitewood, Canoewood


Location

Found growing on Smithfield Road, Smithfield, Maryland
Range:Tulip poplar is distributed throughout the east and southeast portions of the United States.

Physical Description
The leaves are tulip-shaped, alternate, and simple. The leaf is smooth on both surfaces, dark green and lustrous above, pale and often with a slight whitish bloom beneath.
Twigs are moderately stout, olive-brown, to reddish brown, very smooth and usually lustrous; the large terminal bud has two large duck-bill shaped scales.
Tulip poplar produces tulip-shaped, light greenish-yellow flowers from April to June. It is a prolific seed bearer but has a low percent germination. The cone shaped fruit clusters usually persist on branches. There are about 12,000 seeds per pound.
The bark on younger trunks and branches is quite smooth, light ashy-gray with very shallow, longitudinal, whitish furrows. With age the bark becomes very thick, having deep interlacing furrows and rather narrow rounded ridges.
This tree is rapid growing, attaining heights of 80-120 feet and a trunk diameter of 2 to 5 feet. Young trees have a pyramidal form.




Compare Species
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Magnoliaceae
Magnoliales
Magnoliales
Magnolia Order
Magnoliidae
Class of Magnolias
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Early North American explorers were impressed with

the size of the tulip poplars discovered in the New World. Samples of the species were sent to Europe for cultivation and today tulip poplar is the most popular American tree grown in Europe. After the Civil War, railroads accessing southern Appalachia were built and the massive logging of tulip poplar ensued. The wood was used for canoes, ships, paper pulp and construction.
The root is used as a lemon-like flavoring

in spruce beer, where it also serves to correct the

bitterness of the beer
The intensely acrid bitter inner bark, especially of the roots, is used domestically as a diuretic, tonic, and stimulant. The raw green bark is also chewed as an aphrodisiac. The bark contains 'tulipiferine', which is said to exert powerful effects on the heart and nervous system. A tea is used in the treatment of indigestion, dysentery, rheumatism, coughs, fevers etc. Externally, the tea is used as a wash and a poultice on wounds and boils. The root bark and the seeds have both been used to expel worms from the body
The American tulip tree is the state tree of Indiana, Kentuky, and Tennessee.



Tulip Poplar
Flower



Tulip Poplar
Bark



Tulip Poplar
Flower Closeup



Tulip Poplar
Side of Flower



Tulip Poplar
Bud



Tulip Poplar
Flower and leaves

Comment: Tulip Poplar, Liriodendron tulipifera

Page Posts: 4

pgould66
pgould66
October 06, 2012
The wood of tulip poplar is a "soft" hardwood which machines easily but has a slightly fuzzy surface. These charactertistics make it very desirable as a "secondary" wood so it is often used for the inner pieces of furniture vice the "primary" wood which is the one you see - like maple, cherry, oak, et al.
gardengeek
gardengeek
May 29, 2010
These strange flowers are appeared before bees, they are designed to be pollinated by beetles.
Thunder
Thunder
May 29, 2010
As a child, running wild in the western mountains of Maryland, I fell in love with the waxy flowers....I would hold a petal in my hand all day, just to rub my thumb over the surface

gardengeek
gardengeek
May 29, 2010
Awesome! The first time I saw one of these I was certain it was plastic. Very interesting flowers!

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