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ID
  
 
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Ox-eye Daisy
Asteraceae
Chrysanthemum leucanthemum


Thunder
Thunder
Flower Petal # 7+
Main Color    
Color 2    
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb





Asteraceae Family

Chrysanthemum Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Bull's-eye Daisy, Butter Daisy, Dog-blow, Dutch-curse, Dutch-cuss, Herb Margaret, Horse Daisy, Maudlin Daisy, Maudlinwort, Midsummer Daisy, Moonflower, Moon-penny, Poverty-weed, Rhode Island Clover, Sheriff-pink, and Whiteman's-weed


Location

Origin & Range: Native to Europe. From Lapland south and east to the Mediterranean and Siberia, Most of North America, and in England



Physical Description
Flowers large (2 inches in diameter) with long, white rays and a broad yellow disk. Disk depressed in center. Leaves narrow, dark green, and heavily lobed, although not dissected. Plant 1 to 3 feet in height.


Compare Species
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Asteraceae
Asterales
Asterales
Star Order (Daisies)
Euasterids II
Euasterids II
Real Stars Group Two
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Oxeye daisy has moved around the world in a variety of ways. Seeds moved into Sweden with timber and into Ireland as a contaminant of ryegrass and timothy (Holm et al. 1997). It was introduced to the Pacific Northwest in the late 1800ís and spread primarily as a contaminant of forage grass and legume seed. By 1937, it had spread to cover half the counties in the region (Forcella 1985 cited in Holm et al. 1997). The plant continues to move around the region as an ornamental. Although sale distribution of the plant is prohibited in Washington, seed packets continue to appear for sale in nurseries.
The whole plant, and especially the flowers, is antispasmodic, antitussive, diaphoretic, diuretic, emmenagogue, tonic, and vulnerary. It is harvested in May and June then dried for later use. The plant has been employed successfully in the treatment of whooping cough, asthma, and nervous excitability. Externally it is used as a lotion on bruises, wounds, ulcers, and some cutaneous diseases. A decoction of the dried flowers and stems has been used as a wash for chapped hands. Distilled water made from the flowers is an effective eye lotion in the treatment of conjunctivitis
The young spring shoots are finely chopped and added to salads. Rather pungent, they should be used sparingly or mixed with other salad plants. Root - raw. Used in spring
The ancients dedicated it to Artemis, the goddess of women, considering it useful in women's complaints. In Christian days, it was transferred to St. Mary Magdalen and called Maudelyn or Maudlin Daisy after her. Gerard terms it Maudlinwort.
In Victorian times, it was said that if you stepped on seven daisies at one time, you knew that summer had arrived.



Ox-eye Daisy




Ox-eye Daisy




Ox-eye Daisy


Comment: Ox-eye Daisy, Chrysanthemum leucanthemum

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