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ID
  
 
Healthy Home Gardening
 
Clivia
Liliaceae
Clivia miniata


Thunder
Thunder
Flower Petal # 6
Main Color    
Color 2    
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb




Liliaceae Family

Clivia Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Kaffir lily, Bush lily, Boslelie (Afrikaans), umayime (Zulu), St John's Lily and Fire Lily. The older name Kaffir Lily is now judged offensive by many in South Africa, and should be avoided

Physical Description
Kaffir's produce a beautiful cluster of tubular orange flowers with yellow throats. If the flowers are pollinated they each produce a cherry sized, green berry, which slowly turns red over many weeks. They have dark green strappy foliage and their flowers sit atop a fleshy wand-like stem.

Clivia miniata is a clump forming perennial with dark green, strap shaped leaves which arise from a fleshy underground stem. The flowering heads of brilliant orange (rarely yellow), trumpet shaped flowers appear mainly in spring (August to November) but also sporadically at other times of the year. The deep green shiny leaves are a perfect foil for the masses of orange flowers




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Liliaceae
Liliales
Liliales
Monocots
Monocots
One First-Leaves (Monocots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

The Bush Lily (Clivia) was first discovered around 28 September 1813 at the mouth of the Great Fish River in the Eastern Cape by the English naturalist William J Burchell. Around 1823 a botanical collector named James Bowie sent plants that were found in the same area to England. It was however only in October 1828 that the Kew botanist, John Lindley, described the Clivia nobilis and named it after Lady Charlotte Florentia Clive, Baroness of Northumberland, because a plant bought from a Mr Tate as being an Agapanthus, flowered in her collection. Clivia refers to Lady Clive’s surname
In Africa, where traditional health practitioners seriously outnumber university-trained physicians, many people use herbal remedies. Clivia miniata, the lovely Kaffir lily, is valued for medicinal properties including muscle and uterine stimulation and pain relief.
An infusion of Clivia miniata leaves is used to induce labor and speed contractions. Ingesting too much can overstimulate uterine contractions and cause complications.
Clivia miniata rhizomes, or tuberous roots, are used for fever, and the plant extract is also used to treat snakebite and relieve pain
The Zulu use the rhizome to treat fever, and extracts of the whole plant to hasten labor; as a snakebite remedy and to relieve pain
Large quantities must be ingested to cause symptoms of toxicity caused by the alkaloid lycorine, which causes the symptoms of: collapse, diarrhea, paralysis, salivation, vomiting.



Clivia




Clivia




Clivia


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