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Healthy Home Gardening

Purple Loosestrife

Lythraceae Lythrum salicaria

Thunder
Thunder
Flower Info: Petal # 4
Color 1    
Color 2    
Type Categories Useful Parts
Herb
Herb
Food Medicine
Weed
Stems Leaves
Flowers

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Purple Loosestrife

Main Order Diagram | Plant Order List

Lythraceae Family
Purple Loosestrife Purple Loosestrife Crepe Myrtle Pomegranate, Romã White Crape Myrtle Crape Myrtle Purple Loosestrife, salicaire commune

Lythrum Genus
Purple Loosestrife Purple Loosestrife Purple Loosestrife, salicaire commune
Other Names for this Plant

Blooming Sally, Lythrum, Partyke, Purple Willow Herb, Rainbow Weed, Sage Willow, Salicaire


Location

Origin & Range: Native to Europe & Asia. Europe, including Britain, Russian and Central Asia, Australia, North America

Physical Description
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This handsome perennial, 2 to 4 feet in height, has a creeping rhizome, four to six angled, erect, reddish-brown stems, lanceolate leaves from 3 to 6 inches long, entire, sometimes opposite, sometimes in whorls clasping the stem, with reddish purple or pink flowers in whorls forming terminal spikes. It grows in wet or marshy places, varying in different districts in the comparative lengths of stamens and styles, color of flowers and pollen grains. It is odorless, with an astringent taste

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What's This?

Lythraceae
Myrtales
Myrtales
Order of Myrtles
Malvidae
Mallow Class
Eurosids
Real Rose Class
Rosids
Rosids
Rose-Like Class
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus
General Information

Considered an invasive, noxious weed

Purple loosestrife was introduced to the northeastern U.S. and Canada in the 1800s, for ornamental and medicinal uses. It is still widely sold as an ornamental, except in states such as Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Illinois where regulations now prohibit its sale, purchase, and distribution.

acts as a typhus antibiotic, a sore throat gargle, and is given for fever and liver problems.
Although scarcely used at present, Loosestrife has been highly esteemed by many herbalists. It is well established in chronic diarrhea and dysentery, and is used in leucorrhoea and blood-spitting. In Switzerland the decoction was used successfully in an epidemic of dysentery. It has also been employed in fevers, liver diseases, constipation and cholera infantum, and for outward application to wounds and sores.

The leaves are eaten as an emergency. Used as a vegetable and fermented into a mild alcohol

The red-winged blackbird will nest in purple loosestrife stands. The long-billed marsh wren, the major factor in red-winged blackbird nesting mortality, avoids purple loosestrife This avoidance creates a safe nesting site for the blackbirds. Purple loosestrife seeds are not considered part of the diet of the red-winged blackbird

Purple Loosestrife

Purple Loosestrife


Purple Loosestrife

Purple Loosestrife


Purple Loosestrife

Purple Loosestrife


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