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Celosia
Amaranthaceae
Celosia plumosa


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb



Amaranthaceae Family

Celosia Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Cockscomb, Prince of Wales Feathers, Flamingo Feathers, feather celosia, plumed celosia or feathered amaranth


Location

It is native to warm regions of Africa

Physical Description
The celosias or cockscombs are erect, branching plants with oval or lance-shaped, strongly veined leaves 2-6 in (5.1-15.2 cm) long and hundreds of tiny flowers packed in dense, brightly colored flower heads which usually stand above the foliage.

Cockscomb tolerates dry, porous soils and likes full sun. It has large spikes, resembling a rooster's comb with colors of yellow, orange, pink, or gold. Blooming from midsummer to fall, the flowers last long and are used as cut or dried flowers, in borders, beds, and edging.

They grow well in both humid and arid conditions, and their flowers can last for up to 8 weeks. A high number of seeds can be produced by each flower, up to 43,000 per ounce. The plant often grows up to 1 foot in height, though many are smaller. The leaves are either green or bronze/maroon, depending upon the cultivar. The flowers are usually red, yellow, pink, or orange, though other colors can be present. In some instances, a variety of colors are present in hybrids.



Compare Species
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Amaranthaceae
Caryophyllales
Caryophyllales
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

We have been growing and enjoying them in North America since the 18th century. Although reportedly used by Chinese herbalists to stop bleeding, treat diseases of the blood, and infections of the urinary tract, there are no references to its use in any western herbals—modern or centuries old, European or Native American.
Medicinal Uses: The flower and seed is astringent, haemostatic, ophthalmic, parasiticide and poultice. It is used in the treatment of bloody stool, haemorrhoid bleeding, uterine bleeding, leucorrhoea and diarrhea. As a parasiticide it is very effective against Trichomonas, a 20% extract can cause the Trichomonas to disappear in 15 minutes. The seed is hypotensive and ophthalmic. It is used in the treatment of bloodshot eyes, blurring of vision, cataracts and hypertension, but should not be used by people with glaucoma because it dilates the pupils. The seed also has an antibacterial action, inhibiting the growth of Pseudomonas
Food Uses: Leaves and young shoots - cooked. Used as a vegetable
A traditional food plant in Africa, this little-known vegetable has potential to improve nutrition, boost food security, foster rural development and support sustainable landcare.
The leaves and flowers are edible and are grown for such use in Africa and Southeast Asia.
Other Notes: In the Victorian language of flowers, celosias signified humor, warmth, and silliness. Goes to show how little humor they must have had in their lives. Yet, in their way, Victorians were on the right track. Even today, if you watch as folks, especially children, walk by a planting of celosia, you will likely see a grin. Their quirky flowers do beg for attention. Touch the flowers; they are amazingly soft. The cockscomb or cristata types feel like velvet on the sides of the spike.



Celosia




Celosia


Comment: Celosia, Celosia plumosa

Page Posts: 1

MrFlores
MrFlores
June 16, 2010
That's amazing that this is in the same family as amaranth.

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