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Impatiens
Balsaminaceae
Impatiens walleriana


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb


Balsaminaceae Family

Impatiens Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Buzzy lizzy


Location

Native to eastern Africa. From Kenya to Mozambique, Europe, including Britain, from Scandanavia south and east to Spain, the Caucasus and Siberia.

Physical Description
It is a bushy, succulent-stemmed tender perennial that grows in a spreading mound to 6-24” tall depending on variety. It has been extensively hybridized to produce a large number of cultivars featuring flowers in various shades of pink, rose, red, lilac, purple, orange, white, and bicolor versions thereof. Showy, slender-spurred, five-petaled (some doubles are available) flowers (1- 2 1/4” wide) typically cover the plants with colorful bloom from spring to frost. Single flowers have a distinctively flattened appearance. Ovate to elliptic leaves (to 3” long) are light green to dark green, sometimes with a bronze-red cast.


Compare Species
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Balsaminaceae
Ericales
Ericales
Erica Order (Heathers)
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Impatiens ware first brought to England in 1896 by a British physician and naturalist, Dr. John Kirk. In the 1950s, they were available only as open pollinated plants and as a mixture of flower colors. Bob Rieman of Ball Seed Co. started breeding impatiens in 1956 to improve plant qualities, such as flower size and habit, through hybridization. Sluis & Groot introduced the ‘Imp’ series, and the Joseph Harris Seed Co. introduced the ‘Shadeglow’ series in the 1960s. Claude Hope, “Father of Modern Impatiens”, created a series of eight colors of new impatiens in 1965 and worked with PanAmerican Seed in 1968 to introduce the ‘Elfin’ impatiens.

Medicinal Uses: Salep is very nutritive and demulcent. It has been used as a diet of special value for children and convalescents, being boiled with water, flavored and prepared in the same way as arrowroot. Rich in mucilage, it forms a soothing and demulcent jelly that is used in the treatment of irritations of the gastro-intestinal canal. One part of salep to fifty parts of water is sufficient to make a jelly.

This essence of the remedy addresses mental stresses and tensions. It calms feelings of impatience and irritability. It slows the tendency to move too quickly without care or forethought. Calming. Allows one to deepen his her life experience without experiencing burnout.

Food Uses: Root - cooked. It is a source of ’salep’, a fine white to yellowish-white powder that is obtained by drying the tuber and grinding it into a powder. Salep is a starch-like substance with a sweetish taste and a faint somewhat unpleasant smell. It is said to be very nutritious and is made into a drink or can be added to cereals and used in making bread etc. One ounce of salep is said to be enough to sustain a person for a day.





Impatiens


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