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Gerbera Daisy
Asteraceae
Gerbera jamesonii


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb

Asteraceae Family

Gerbera Genus
Other Names for this Plant

African daisy, Transvaal daisy, Barberton daisy


Location

It is indigenous to South Africa

Physical Description
Gerbera daisy flowers exhibit large (4") blooms with yellowish central disks surrounded by colorful rays. The rays are most commonly yellow, red or orange. However, growers have also produced varieties in white, pink and violet. Gerbera daisy flowers reach a little over one foot in height, with a width slightly less than that.


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Asteraceae
Asterales
Asterales
Star Order (Daisies)
Euasterids II
Euasterids II
Real Stars Group Two
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

The first scientific description of a Gerbera was made by J.D. Hooker in Curtis's Botanical Magazine in 1889 when he described Gerbera jamesonii, a South African species also known as Transvaal daisy or Barberton Daisy.

The gerbera daisy was discovered in 1884 near Barberton, South Africa, by Scotsman Robert Jameson. While the flower’s scientific name, Gerbera jamesonii, recollects the name of its founder, the meaning of its common name draws from German naturalist Traugott Gerber. Breeding programs that began in England in 1890 enhanced the flower’s quality and color variations. The gerbera daisy’s popularity soon traveled to growers in the Netherlands which, along with Columbia, is the primary distributor of the flower’s cut version today. The gerbera currently ranks as the fifth most popular flower in the world behind the rose, carnation, chrysanthemum, and tulip.

Cultivation: This long-rooted plant likes deep, well-drained loam or sandy soil. Plant about 1 foot apart in beds. Fertilize frequently throughout summer to encourage blooming. Soggy conditions and soil in the crown will cause gerbers to rot - do not plant too deeply. Full sun. Will tolerate light shade. Water during dry periods. USDA Zones 9 - 11. Can tolerate some frost but freezing temperatures will kill plant to the roots. Gerber daisies are becoming popular with gardeners in colder zones where they are grown in the garden as an annual or dug up, potted, and over wintered indoors.

Propagation: Propagate by division of clumps. Seeds will work too, but plants will vary wildly in form and color





Gerbera Daisy




Gerbera Daisy




Gerbera Daisy




Gerbera Daisy




Gerbera Daisy
Leaves



Gerbera Daisy
Curtis’s Botanical Magazine London, 1787-1800 engraving by Lansdown Guilding [Image in the public Domain]

Comment: Gerbera Daisy, Gerbera jamesonii

Page Posts: 1

gardengeek
gardengeek
June 19, 2010
Those are some beautiful Gerberas! dazzling colors!

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