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Joe-Pye Weed
Asteraceae
Eupatorium purpureum


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb


Asteraceae Family

Eupatorium Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Gravel Root, Gravelweed, Joe-Pye Weed, Queen of the Meadow, Purple Boneset, Trumpet Weed, Kidney Root


Location

Native of the eastern United States

Physical Description
It is an erect, clump-forming perennial, which typically grows 4-7 tall and features coarsely-serrated, lance-shaped, dark green leaves (to 12 long) in whorls of 3-4 on sturdy green stems with purplish leaf nodes. Tiny, vanilla-scented, dull pinkish-purple flowers in large, terminal, domed, compound inflorescences bloom in mid-summer to early fall. Each flower cluster typically has 5-7 florets.


Compare Species
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Asteraceae
Asterales
Asterales
Star Order (Daisies)
Euasterids II
Euasterids II
Real Stars Group Two
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Queen of the Meadow (Eupatorium purpureum), also called Gravel root, Kidney root, Purple boneset and Joe Pye Weed after the Native American herbalist Joe Pye, has an apple scent. Infuse the dried root and flowers for a diuretic tea to relieve kidney and urinary problems. The tea is also used to induce sweating and break a high fever. Also useful for rheumatism, gravel (gallstones), and dropsy (fluid retention).
Medicinal Uses: Diuretic, anti-lithic, anti-rheumatic, stimulant, tonic, astringent, relaxant.
Gravel Root is used primarily for kidney stones or gravel. In urinary infections such as cystitis and urethritis it may be used with benefit, whilst it can also play a useful role in a systemic treatment of rheumatism and gout.
Combinations : For kidney stones or gravel it combines well with Stone Root, Parsley Piert, Pellitory of the Wall or Hydrangea.
E. maculatum decoction or infusion of leaf and root powder taken internally to treat urinary tract stones and other kidney and urinary tract problems. Also root decoction was used to treat bed wetting in kids; and as a diuretic to treat congestive heart failure (dropsy). The tea was also used for treating asthma. Native Americans used E. maculatum for treating menstrual disorders, dysmenorhea, and as a recovery tea for women after pregnancy. E. purpureum was used by Cherokee to treat rheumatism and arthritis and as a diuretic. An infusion of root is said to be a laxative. Potawatomi used fresh leaves as poultice. Navajo used root as antidote to poisoning. Historically, Colonists claimed to have been successful treatment for typhus in New England Colonial times.
Food Uses: Not Edible. Some tribes used root ash as a spice or as a salt substitute.
Other Notes: Cherokee and other tribes used stems like straws. Root of E. purpureum used by Meskwaki as an aphrodisiac (Apparently sucked on root while wooing or lovemaking). This is a striking late summer bloomer worth adding to your wild flower garden.
Cultivation: Succeeds in ordinary garden soil that is well drained but moisture retentive in sun or part shade. Plants can be grown in quite coarse grass, which can be cut annually in the autumn. A very cold-hardy plant, tolerating temperatures down to about -25°c. The bruised leaves have a vanilla-like odor.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It requires moist soil.

Propagation: Seed - sow spring in a cold frame and only just cover the seed. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out into their permanent positions in the summer. Division in spring or autumn. Very easy, the clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions.




Joe-Pye Weed




Joe-Pye Weed


Comment: Joe-Pye Weed, Eupatorium purpureum

Page Posts: 1


Gail Beck

September 09, 2010

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