Home

Plants

Tree of Life

ID
  
 
Healthy Home Gardening
 
Mimosa
Fabaceae
Mimosa humilis


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Tree




Fabaceae Family

Mimosa Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Powder Puff Tree, Silk Tree, Lenkoran acacia or bastard tamarind, pink siris. In Japan its common names are nemunoki, nemurinoki and nenenoki which all mean "sleeping tree".


Location

Native from Iran to Japan. They have become naturalized in the United States from Maryland south to Florida, and west into eastern Texas

Physical Description
A small to medium-sized tree that can grow up to 20-40 feet tall. The bark is light brown, nearly smooth, and generally thin with lens shaped areas along the stem. The attractive fern-like leaves of mimosa are finely divided, 5-8 inches long by about 3-4 inches wide, and alternate along the stems. Silk tree has showy and fragrant pink flowers, about 1½ inches long, which resemble pom-poms and are arranged in panicles at the ends of branches. Fruits are flat, straw-colored pods about 6 inches long containing light brown oval-shaped seeds about ½ inch in length. Pods ripen in August to September and begin to disintegrate soon after, but remain on the trees into winter.


Compare Species
?

Fabaceae
Bean Family
Fabales
Fabales
Order of Beans
NOX Clad
Nitrogen Bean Clad
Oxid-Faba
Fabidae
Bean-Like Class
Eurosids
Real Rose Class
Rosids
Rosids
Rose-Like Class
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Silk tree was introduced to the U.S. in 1745. Silk tree continues to be a popular ornamental because of its fragrant and showy flowers.

Medicinal Uses: Extracts of the plant have been shown in scientific trials to be a moderate diuretic, depress duodenal contractions similar to atropine sulphone, promote regeneration of nerves, and reduce menorrhagia (Modern-natural 2001).

Antidepressant activity has been demonstrated in humans (Martínez and others 1996). Root extracts are reported to be a strong emetic (Guzmán 1975).

Traditionally known in China as the "herb of happiness," is one of the most valued Chinese botanicals for supporting a healthy mood during periods of occasional anxiety and stress. Albizia flowers and bark have been used for centuries to elevate the mood, promote mental calmness, and support a peaceful night's sleep. 1 4 teaspoon (approx. 1 dropperful) five times daily.

The flowers are also used in various herbal preparations and tinctures. Mimosa tree bark is often sold dried in shredded form, and it can also be found in capsules and tinctures.

In TCM, mimosa tree bark is sometimes called Collective Happiness Bark, because it is used as a general antidepressant. It affects the heart and liver meridians, and since the heart houses the shen, or spirit, mimosa tree bark can be used to calm the spirit and reduce the symptoms associated with depression and general spiritual unrest. Mimosa tree bark is also used to treat inflammation, particularly external pain, and swelling.

Food Uses: Produces nectar for bees and butterflies.

Used as a flavoring in some commercially produced foods

Famine food: China: leaves boiled and eaten with oil and salt.

Young leaves - cooked. An aromatic flavor, they are used as a potherb. Flowers - cooked. Eaten as a vegetable. The dried leaves are a tea substitute

Other Notes: Silk tree is listed by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council as a Category I species, defined as an invasive exotic plant that is disrupting native plant communities. In many parts of Florida and the southeast, silk tree has invaded road shoulders, abandoned fields, and (in rare cases) natural habitats

Warning: Due to a neurotoxin present in the seeds this plant is toxic to Humans, sheep, goats, and cattle. The signs of poisoning are Seizures and even death on ingestion. These signs include seizures, tremors, staggering gait, convulsions, and labored breathing in some cases. Administration of pyridoxine or pyridoxine HCL counteracted the effects of the neurotoxic alkaloids

by quickly relieving seizures.





Mimosa
New flowers and old flowers



Mimosa
Flowers and buds



Mimosa
Seedpods



Mimosa
Tree

Comment: Mimosa, Mimosa humilis

Look for Mimosa on:
Google: Mimosa Wikipedia: Mimosa YouTube: Mimosa
Phylogenetic Tree of Life

Learn how to create a custom
Tree of Life





© Copyright 2006 - 2020 HealthyHomeGardening.com.
All Rights Reserved.
Web Design by Artatom