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Healthy Home Gardening

Lace-Cap Hydrangea

Hydrangeaceae Hydrangea macrophylla

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Thunder
Flower Info: Petal # 7+
Color 1    
Color 2    
Type Categories Useful Parts
Shrub
Shrub
Food Medicine
Poison
Leaves Flowers

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Lace-Cap Hydrangea

Main Order Diagram | Plant Order List

Hydrangeaceae Family
Taube Lace Cap Hydrangea Lace-Cap Hydrangea Unknown Plant Mophead Hydrangea Bigleaf Hydrangea Bigleaf Hydrangea Flower Bigleaf Hydrangea, French Hydrangea, Lacecap Hydrangea

Hydrangea Genus
Taube Lace Cap Hydrangea Lace-Cap Hydrangea Unknown Plant Mophead Hydrangea Bigleaf Hydrangea Bigleaf Hydrangea Flower
Other Names for this Plant

Twist-n-Shout Hydrangea, Bigleaf Hydrangea, French Hydrangea, Lacecap Hydrangea, Mophead Hydrangea, Penny Mac, Hydrangea Lace-Cap and Hortensia


Location

Native to E. Asia

Physical Description
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Hydrangea is a rounded shrub with huge, deciduous, opposite, serrated, medium to dark green leaves. It is usually seen at 3-6 ft (0.9-1.8 m) with an equal spread, but older specimens can exceed 8 ft (2.4 m)! Flowers are arranged in huge, ball shaped clusters on the most common varieties. There are many selected varieties (and many hybrids), the most striking of which is a variegated-leaf form that bears flat, or lace-capped inflorescences. Flowers on most hydrangeas are pH-sensitive, with dark purple or blue flowers in acidic soil, white or dull green in neutral earth, and pink in alkaline soil.

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What's This?

Hydrangeaceae
Cornales
Cornales
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus
General Information

Medicinal Uses: The leaves, roots and flowers are antimalarial, antitussive and diuretic. They are said to be a more potent antimalarial than quinine, due to the presence of an alkaloid
Diuretic, cathartic, tonic. The decoction is said to have been used with great advantage by the Cherokee Indians, and later, by the settlers, for calculous diseases. It does not cure stone in the bladder, but, as demonstrated to the medical profession by Dr. S. W. Butler, of Burlington, N.J., it removes gravelly deposits and relieves the pain consequent on their emission. As many as 120 calculi have been known to come from one person under its use.
The fluid extract is principally used for earthy deposits, alkaline urine, chronic gleet, and mucous irritations of the bladder in aged persons. A concentrated syrup with sugar or honey, or a simple decoction of the root, may also be used. In overdoses, it will cause vertigo, oppressions of the chest, etc
Food Uses: Hydrangea tea, called ama-cha in Japan, is an infusion beverage made from tea leaves and hydrangea petals.
The young leaves, when dried and rubbed between the hands, become very sweet and are used to make a sweet tea called 'tea of heaven', it is used in Buddhist ceremonies. The leaves contain phellodulcin (its chemical formula is C16 H14 O), a very sweet substance that can be used as a sugar substitute. One small leaf is sufficient to sweeten a cup of tea. The older leaves can be dried, powdered and used as a flavoring on foods. The young leaves and shoots are also eaten cooked. Young leaves contain the toxin hydrocyanic acid, this reduces as the leaves grow older, often to zero levels
Other Notes: The coarse green foliage works well as a foundation plant or accent in a flower garden, or does well in containers for use on shaded patios and decks. Massed together on three to five-foot centers, their foliage makes a strong statement in a shrub border or in other areas of the landscape. They make a nice accent plant when placed among other shrubs due to the coarse foliage.
Flowers are easily air-dried and are long lasting. They may be spray painted for color or left in their natural state and treated with hair spray to stiffen and preserve.
Hydrangea paniculata is reportedly sometimes smoked as an intoxicant, despite the danger of illness and/or death due to the cyanide.
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Warning: This plant can be moderately toxic if Bark, leaves, or flower budsare eaten due to the presence of Hydrangin, a Cyanogenic glycoside. Symptoms of poisoning are Nausea, stomach pain, vomiting, sweating

Lace-Cap Hydrangea

Lace-Cap Hydrangea


Lace-Cap Hydrangea

Lace-Cap Hydrangea


Lace-Cap Hydrangea

Lace-Cap Hydrangea


Lace-Cap Hydrangea

Lace-Cap Hydrangea


Comment: Lace-Cap Hydrangea, Hydrangea macrophylla

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