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Feild Bindweed
Convolvulaceae
Convolvulus arvensis


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Vine



Convolvulaceae Family

Convolvulus Genus
Other Names for this Plant

creeping jenny, European bindweed, morning glory, perennial morning glory, small flowered morning glory


Location

Native to Europe, Asia. Introduced to U.S. Now in AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, HI, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS, MT, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, VT, WA, WI, WV, WY

Physical Description
A perennial trailing or climbing vine with white trumpet-shaped flowers that may reach 3-1/3 feet in length. Field bindweed is primarily a weed of nurseries, agronomic crops, and fencerows and can be found throughout the United States. Cotyledons are square-shaped and dark green with relatively prominent white to light green veins. Leaves are triangular in outline with leaf bases that are lobed and point outward. Leaves and stems may be with or without hairs. Field bindweed is often confused with wild buckwheat. However, wild buckwheat has inward-pointing bases and an ocrea at the base of each petiole



Compare Species
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Convolvulaceae
Solanales
Solanales
Nightshade Order
Euasterids I
Euasterids I
Real Stars Group One
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Field bindweed is a native of Europe and western Asia and was first documented in the United States in 1739 in Virginia. The plant most likely arrived in the United States as a contaminant in farm and garden seeds. Field bindweed was reported in Pennsylvania in 1812 and Maine in 1824. The plant rapidly spread westward after completion of the railroad and appeared in Kansas by 1877. Field bindweed infested all of the western states by 1900.

Medicinal Uses: The root, and also a resin made from the root, is cholagogue, diuretic, laxative, and strongly purgative. The dried root contains 4.9% resin. The juice of the root is used in the treatment of fevers. A tea made from the flowers is laxative and is also used in the treatment of fevers and wounds. A cold tea made from the leaves is laxative and is also used as a wash for spider bites or taken internally to reduce excessive menstrual flow

Food Uses: The plant has been used as a flavoring in a liqueur called 'Noyeau'. No details are given as to which part of the plant is used





Feild Bindweed




Feild Bindweed


Comment: Feild Bindweed, Convolvulus arvensis

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