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Healthy Home Gardening
 
Foxtail Agave
Agavaceae
Agave attenuata


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Shrub

Agavaceae Family

Agave Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Lions Tail, Swan’s Neck, Spineless Century Plant, Elephant’s Trunk, Gooseneck Succulent, Soft Leaved Agave, Dragon Tree Agave


Location

Native to the plateau of central Mexico. More recent study has reported it from Jalisco east to Mexico, in small colonies at elevations of 1,900 to 2,500 meters (6,200 to 8,200 ft), but there have been few sightings, suggesting this Agave is rare in the wild.

Physical Description
The stems typically range from 50 to 150 cm (20–60 in) in length, and eventually old leaves fall off, leaving them naked and visible. The leaves are ovate-accuminate, 50–70 cm (20–28 in) long and 12–16 cm (5–6 in) wide, pale in color, ranging from a light gray to a light yellowish green. There are no teeth, nor terminal spines, although the leaves taper to points that fray with age. The inflorescence is a dense raceme 2.5 to 3 meters (8 to 10 ft) high, with greenish-yellow flowers.

Blooms only when the plant is 10 years old or more. The flower stalk is large (7 to 13 feet - 2 to 4 m) with yellow-green drooping flowers organized as a raceme. The plant then dies leaving suckers that grow into replacement plants




Compare Species
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Agavaceae
Asparagales
Asparagales
Monocots
Monocots
One First-Leaves (Monocots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

The original specimens were sent to Kew by the explorer Galeotti in 1834, from an unspecified location in central Mexico

Cultivation: Although Agave attenuata survives in poor soils, it does best in rich soils ( 2 parts peat moss to 1 part loam to 1 part sand). The plant is extremely drought tolerant but does better with ample moisture. As plants get older, they produce stout trunks up to 5 ft. tall, and form clumps to 5 ft. across. Soft Leaved Agave is an excellent house plant for southern exposures. It lacks the spines that most Agaves have.

Propagation: Propagation is by detaching the well-rooted suckers appearing at the base, or by uprooting germinating seedlings near the plant.





Foxtail Agave


Comment: Foxtail Agave, Agave attenuata

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