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Indian Pinks
Caryophyllaceae
Dianthus chinensis


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb



Caryophyllaceae Family

Dianthus Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Pinks, Dianthus, Chinese Pink, Rainbow Pink


Location

Native to northern China, Korea, Mongolia, and southeastern Russia



Physical Description
It is a herbaceous perennial or biennial plant growing to 30–50 cm tall. The leaves are green to grayish green, slender, 3–5 cm long and 2–4 mm broad. The flowers are white, pink, or red, 3–4 cm diameter, produced singly or in small clusters from spring to mid summer.


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Caryophyllaceae
Caryophyllales
Caryophyllales
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

The Chinese pink has been used for over 2,000 years in Chinese herbal medicine.

Medicinal Uses: The whole plant is a bitter tonic herb that stimulates the digestive and urinary systems and also the bowels. It is also anthelmintic, antibacterial, antiphlogistic, diaphoretic, diuretic, emmenagogue, febrifuge and haemostatic. It is used internally in the treatment of acute urinary tract infections (especially cystitis), urinary stones, constipation, and failure to menstruate. It is used externally to treat skin inflammations and swellings. The old leaves are crushed and used for clearing the eyesight.

Cultivation: Prefers a rich well-drained loamy neutral to alkaline soil in a sunny position, but succeeds in most soils including dry ones. A very ornamental plant, it is usually biennial in habit, but can be a short-lived perennial. There are many cultivars that are widely grown in gardens. Since these flower freely in their first year and then degenerate, they are usually treated as annuals

Propagation: They can be started outside or inside. In mild winter areas, plant them or start them in late fall. In cold winter areas, start them inside 6 weeks before the last frost date, or sow them in place 2 weeks before the last frost date. Germination takes a week to a week and a half. Cover the seeds with a thin layer of mulch. Transplant or thin out 8 inches apart (20 cm). Deadhead regularly, and trim severely when the blossom slows down to get a second flush.





Indian Pinks




Indian Pinks




Indian Pinks




Indian Pinks




Indian Pinks




Indian Pinks
Francisco Manuel Blanco (O.S.A.) 1880-1883? Plate from book [Image in Public Domain]



Indian Pinks
Curtis’s Botanical Magazine London, 1787-1800 engraving by Lansdown Guilding [Image in the public Domain]

Comment: Indian Pinks, Dianthus chinensis

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