Home

Plants

Tree of Life

ID
  
 
Healthy Home Gardening
 
Broccoli
Brassicaceae
Brassica oleracea italica


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb



Brassicaceae Family

Brassica Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Brocks, Calabrese, Italian Asparagus, and Italian Broccoli


Location

Native to the Mediterranean area and Asia Minor

Physical Description
Biennial growing to 0.9m. It is not frost tender. It is in flower from May to August, and the seeds ripen from July to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees. The plant is self-fertile. We rate it 5 out of 5 for usefulness.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral, and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It requires moist soil. The plant can tolerate maritime exposure.




Compare Species
?

Brassicaceae
Brassicales
Brassicales
Order of Mustard
Eumalvids
Real Mallows
Malvidae
Mallow Class
Eurosids
Real Rose Class
Rosids
Rosids
Rose-Like Class
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

It has been popular in Italy since the days of the Roman Empire. However, records indicate this vegetable was unknown in England until a relatively recent few hundred years ago. It has become popular in the United States only since last century. Broccoli has been grown for more than two thousand years. During the 16th century, Broccoli was grown in Italy and France. It began to be commercially grown in the United States in the 1920s.

Medicinal Uses: Diuretic, promotes eye vision. Broccoli is known as a cancer fighter and diabetes preventer.

By supplementing regularly with Broccoli you can reduce or prevent ailments like cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis and heart disease.

Broccoli is used to treat eye inflammations and near-sightedness; anemia (the blood is deficient in red blood cells); children's respiratory infections, measles and gastroenteritis (inflammation of the lining membrane of the stomach and the intestines); smoking; and cancer.

Food Uses: Young flowering stems and leaves - raw or cooked. The shoots of sprouting broccoli are harvested when about 10cm long, and before the flowers open, the shoots look somewhat like a small white or purple cauliflower and have a delicious flavor. They are considered to be a gourmet vegetable. When picking the stems, make sure that you leave behind a section of the stem with leaves on it, since the plants will often produce new side shoots from the leaf axils.

Calabrese and Romanesco plants produce a central inflorescence rather like a small cauliflower, which are sometimes followed by a number of smaller flowering shoots. They usually come into bearing in the late summer or autumn and are very productive if they are regularly harvested.

Sprouting broccoli plants come into production in late winter to early spring and can be very heavy bearing over a period of two months or more so long as all the flowering stems are harvested before coming into flower.

Other Notes: Roman references to a cabbage family vegetable that may have been broccoli are less than perfectly clear: the Roman natural history writer, Pliny the Elder, wrote about a vegetable which might have been broccoli. Some vegetable scholars recognize broccoli in the cookbook of Apicius.
Broccoli was certainly an Italian vegetable, as its name suggests, long before it was eaten elsewhere. Its first mention in France is in 1560, but in 1724 broccoli was still so unfamiliar in England that Philip Miller's Gardener's Dictionary (1724 edition) referred to it as a stranger in England and explained it as "sprout colli-flower" or "Italian asparagus". In the American colonies, Thomas Jefferson was also an experimentative gardener with a wide circle of European correspondents, from whom he got packets of seeds for rare vegetables such as tomatoes, noted the planting of broccoli at Monticello along with radishes, lettuce, and cauliflower on May 27, 1767. Nevertheless, broccoli remained an exotic in American gardens. In 1775, John Randolph, in A Treatise on Gardening by a Citizen of Virginia, felt he had to explain about broccoli: "The stems will eat like Asparagus, and the heads like Cauliflower."

Cultivation: Succeeds in full sun in a well-drained fertile preferably alkaline soil. Tolerates a pH in the range 4.3 to 8.3. Prefers a heavy soil. Succeeds in any reasonable soil. Succeeds in maritime gardens.

Some forms are very cold-hardy, tolerating temperatures down to about -17°c.

Propagation: Seed - sow sprouting broccoli in a seedbed outdoors in March to May. Plant out in June. Do not let the seedlings get overcrowded or they will soon become leggy and will not make such good plants. If your seedlings do get leggy, it is possible to plant them rather deeper into the soil - the buried stems will soon form roots and the plant will be better supported.

Harvest: The central head should be harvested first when it is still tight and compact, with no opened flowers. It takes from 60-100 days from planting to first harvest. As much as 5 inches of the flower stalks should be cut along with the buds. Do not allow the stems to become tough and woody. After the central head is removed, side shoots will develop. Although smaller, these should be harvested at 2- to 4-day intervals. The entire harvest period may run from 40-80 days, depending on the season, crop condition, and locality.

Companion Planting: A good companion for celery and other aromatic plants since these seem to reduce insect predations. Grows badly with potatoes, beet, and onions. Grows well with potatoes, beet and onions according to another report



Broccoli


Comment: Broccoli, Brassica oleracea italica

Look for Broccoli on:
Google: Broccoli Wikipedia: Broccoli YouTube: Broccoli
Phylogenetic Tree of Life

Learn how to create a custom
Tree of Life





© Copyright 2006 - 2017 HealthyHomeGardening.com.
All Rights Reserved.
Web Design by Artatom