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Marigold
Asteraceae
Tagetes erecta


Thunder
Thunder
Flower Petal # 7+
Main Color    
Color 2    
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb


Asteraceae Family

Tagetes Genus
Other Names for this Plant

African Marigold, Mexican Marigold, Aztec Marigold


Location

Native to Mexico and Central America

Physical Description
The African marigolds (Tagetes erecta), also called American marigolds, are tall stout plants that grow to 3 ft (0.9 m) in height. They have larger blossoms and a shorter flowering period than their French cousins - remove faded flowers to encourage a second flush of bloom


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Asteraceae
Asterales
Asterales
Star Order (Daisies)
Euasterids II
Euasterids II
Real Stars Group Two
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Medicinal Uses: The whole herb is anthelmintic, aromatic, digestive, diuretic, emmenagogue, sedative, and stomachic. It is used internally in the treatment of indigestion, colic, severe constipation, coughs, and dysentery. Externally, it is used to treat sores, ulcers, and eczema. Used to treat sore eyes and rheumatism. The leaves are harvested as required for immediate use during the growing season, whilst the flowering plant can be dried and stored for later use. A paste of the leaves is applied externally to treat boils, carbuncles, and earaches. The flowers are carminative, diuretic, and vermifuge. A decoction is used to treat colds, and mumps. It is applied externally to treat skin diseases, conjunctivitis, and sore eyes. The root is laxative.

It acts as an anti-oxidant that protects the eye from free radical damage. In India the Marigold is known as Gendu; the leaves of which are used to heal conjunctivitis, cuts and scratches and bruises. The fresh leaf is ground up; the juice is squeezed and applied a few drops at a time to the affected part.

Food Uses: The petals of Tagetes are rich in the orange-yellow carotenoid lutein and as such extracts of T. erecta are used as a food colour
The petals of the flowers of some varieties can be eaten. Children eat the fresh receptacle. A yellow dye obtained from the flowers can be used as a saffron substitute for coloring and flavoring foods. The plant is used as a condiment. (This probably refers to the use of the flowers as an edible dye)

Try it sometime to flavor your rice, it imparts a slightly spicy, pungent flavor or toss a few plucked petals in your salad for a little pizzazz

Dried and crumbled petals can pinch-hit for oh-so-expensive saffron in casseroles, breads, and omelets . . . adding a unique, subtle flavor to these dishes. Stir-fried alone or with vegetables-the petals add zip to any meal. They're also colorful and tasty in rice, soups, or stews . . . or when sprinkled on salads. Furthermore, the flowers are nutritious! They contain carotene, which can be converted in humans to vitamin A.

Other Notes: The blossoms also make a yellow dye for fabric. For dye…. fill the dye pot with marigold blossoms, cover with water, and simmer for one hour. Strain the plant matter and add 6 teaspoons of alum, soak fabric long enough to get the desired depth of color.

The Marigold is very significant in Nepalese culture where marigold garlands are used almost in every household especially during the Tihar festival. The flowers are often sold in local markets in Nepal and used as an offering to the Gods.

It was a sacred herb of the Aztecs who used the flowers to decorate their shrines and temples. Upon arrival of the Spanish in the early 16th century the flower took on a whole new significance. It became a living symbol of the Spanish massacre of the Aztec people. The red blood of the Aztecs splashed over the yellow gold the Spanish stole. Marigolds are sometimes called, flor de muerto, flower of death, and represent pain and grief. The marigold was regarded as the flower of the dead in pre-Hispanic Mexico, parallel to the lily in Europe, and is still widely used in the Day of the Dead celebrations.

The scent of marigold was believed to form a spiritual path that the souls of deceased family members could follow. The flowers were much used for decorating graves, alters, especially during the holiday that is now called the Day of the Dead.

The marigold is also widely cultivated in India and Thailand, particularly the species T. erecta, T. patula, and T. tenuifolia. Vast quantities of marigolds are used in garlands and decoration for weddings, festivals, and religious events

During the 16th century, those who could not afford monetary offerings to the church would place these beautiful yellow flowers at the feet of Virgin Mary statues to signify their love and constancy. Nicknamed "Mary's gold", this magical yellow flower became the "marigold".

Marigolds are known as the "Herb of the Sun" and are symbolic of passion and creativity. The Welsh believed that if marigolds were not open early in the morning, then a storm was on the way. Marigolds have been used as love charms and incorporated into wedding garlands. Water made from marigolds was thought to induce psychic visions of fairies if rubbed on the eyelids. In some cultures, marigold flowers have been added to pillows to encourage prophetic or psychic dreams.

The marigold was once thought to protect against the plague and to be effective in stopping gossip. Interestingly, the marigold can symbolize cruelty and jealousy. When used in combination with spells, however, the marigold is an anti-dote for the sharp-tongued and promotes cheery conversations.

Marigolds are symbols of consistency and strength in love. They are used in wedding processions, marriage garlands, and love potions. "Marigold water" (the water made by steeping the flower), gently rubbed on eyelids, is believed to bestow the gift of fairy sight. Place them under the bed before sleep, or stuff the blossoms into pillows, and the power of the marigold will guide your dreams to reality. Marigolds dropped into the bathwater are said to make the bather more attractive and confident--thereby often attracting love. Eating marigold petals is believed to change one's luck in love--also known as an herb of the Sun; the marigold is connected to the sign of Leo. On a day filled with the blues, or if your confidence is low, place a pot of marigolds on your table. Meditate on them; allow their brightness to envelope you, and your spirits will lift!

In days of old, marigold garlands were strung on homes to ward off evil. Consider weaving marigolds into the wreath on your front doors both a protection and a guide for the passing spirits on All Hallows Eve. If you plant to connect with loved ones during this time, a pot of marigolds on the table will help guide them to your consciousness.

The versatility of the marigold and its ability to bring forth the darkness and the light account for its well-loved place in gardens and folk tales. It is a paradoxical flower, welcoming spirits as well as protecting us from unwanted visitors during the harvest time

Cultivation: Requires a well-drained moderately fertile soil in a sunny position. Grows well in heavy clay soils and in sandy soils. Although not very frost resistant, it can be grown as a tender annual in Britain, sowing the seed in a greenhouse in the spring and planting out after the last expected frosts. A number of named forms have been developed for their ornamental value. Removing dead flowers before the seed is formed will extend the flowering season. Plants are prone to attacks by slugs, snails, and botrytis.

Propagation: The black needle-like seeds can be easily sown directly where they are to be grown - even by young kids. When seedlings are 1-2 in (2.5-5 cm) high thin to 12 in (30 cm) apart. They can also be sown indoors and transplanted outdoors when danger of frost has passed.

Companion Planting: Plant marigolds in the vegetable garden where they are said to discourage certain insect pests, can be grown amongst crops such as potatoes and tomatoes.

Secretions from the roots of growing plants have an insecticidal effect on the soil, effective against nematodes and to some extent against keeled slugs. These secretions are produced about 3 - 4 months after sowing. The flower petals also have nematacidal properties. The growing plant is also said to repel insects and can be grown amongst crops such as potatoes and tomatoes.



Marigold




Marigold




Marigold


Comment: Marigold, Tagetes erecta

Page Posts: 1

leacarter1
leacarter1
August 12, 2010

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