Home

Plants

Tree of Life

ID
  
 
Healthy Home Gardening
 
Persimmon
Ebenaceae
Diospyros virginiana


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Tree



Ebenaceae Family

Diospyros Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Common Persimmon, American persimmon, ‘Simmon, Possumwood, and Florida Persimmon


Location

Grows in the whole of the Northern Hemisphere, exclusive of the tropics.

Physical Description
The persimmon is a slow-growing deciduous tree, rarely exceeding 50 ft (15 m) in height. The leaves are generally elliptic, 4-6 in (10-15 cm) long, dark green on top and pale green underneath. The bark on older trunks is black and broken up into distinctive, regular square blocks. The flowers are greenish and inconspicuous, with each tree having only male (staminate) or female (pistillate) flowers, a condition called dioecious. The female lowers develop into showy orange fruits, up to 2 in (5 cm) in diameter, that are very astringent during maturation, but deliciously sweet when fully ripe. Several cultivars selected for fruit quality, seedlessness, cold hardiness and disease resistance are available


Compare Species
?

Ebenaceae
Ericales
Ericales
Erica Order (Heathers)
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Used as food and medicine by many Native American tribes. The persimmon native to North America is the diaspyros virginiana that the Algonquin Indians called "putchamin, pasiminan, or pessamin," depending on the dialect of the tribe.

Medicinal Uses: A decoction of the boiled fruit was used to treat bloody stools. (This probably refers to the unripe fruit, which is very astringent). The leaves are rich in vitamin C and are used as an antiscorbutic. A decoction of the inner-bark is highly astringent. It has been used as a mouth rinse in the treatment of thrush and sore throats. Used externally as a wash for warts or cancers
The inner bark and unripe fruit are sometimes used in treatment of fevers, diarrhea, and hemorrhage
Persimmons have been used to lubricate the lungs and strengthen the spleen and pancreas. They improve energy and contain enzymes that help damaged cells and foreign microbes be broken down. Persimmons have a special affinity for the large intestines and heart. Persimmons have been used to treat bronchitis, catarrh, cough, diarrhea, dysentery, goiter, hangover, hemorrhoids, hiccoughs,

hypertension, mouth sores, pleurisy, stomachache, and ulcers. In Thailand, persimmons are eaten to rid the body of hookworms.

Remove a few twigs from a persimmon tree, cover them with water, and boil for 20 minutes. Strain and cool the liquid. Applied on a poison ivy or poison oak rash, it will stop the itch immediately, and after a few applications will dry the rash.

Food Uses: Fruit - raw, cooked or dried and used in breads, cakes, pies, puddings etc. About the size of a plum, the fruit has an exquisitely rich flavor when it is fully ripe (and almost at the point of going bad) but it is very harsh and astringent before then. The fruit may not ripen properly in a cool summer, though if it is frosted it normally develops a very good flavor. The fruit can also be harvested in the autumn, preferably after a frost, and bletted. (This is a process where the fruit is kept in a cool place and only eaten when it is very soft and almost at the point of going rotten). Much of the fruit on trees in a relatively sunny position at Kew after a relatively warm summer in 1996 was still not fully ripe, though it was very nearly so and ripened well off the tree. The fruit can also be dried and used in bread, cakes etc. The fruit is up to 4.5cm in diameter. Molasses can be made from the fruit pulp. Oil obtained from the seeds is said to taste like peanut oil. A tea is made from the dried leaves. It is high in vitamin C and has a pleasant flavor somewhat like sassafras. The roasted seed is used as a coffee substitute

Ripe persimmons are delicious out of hand, and can be made into puddings and cakes. Frozen, they satisfy like ice cream, while dried persimmons are like dates.

Other Notes: Indelible ink is made from fruit.

Weather Lore: Persimmon seeds are flattened. In order to use this "weather forecasting method", one splits a persimmon seed parallel to the flattened sides. Once split, the appearance little whitish sprout is examined. The sprout generally forms a fork, knife, or spoon. If one sees the fork, it means a mild winter. If one sees a spoon, it means a lot of snow for the upcoming winter. If one sees a knife, it means cold winter winds are ahead

Cultivation: Requires a good deep loamy soil in sun or light shade. If being grown for its fruit, the tree requires a warm, sunny, sheltered position. It dislikes very acid or wet and poorly drained soils. Plants are somewhat tender when young, though dormant mature trees are hardy to about -35°c. The young growth in spring, even on mature plants, is frost-tender and so it is best to grow the plants in a position sheltered from the early morning sun. Dioecious, but the female tree can produce seedless fruits in the absence of a pollinator. It is likely that unfertilized fruits are more astringent than fertilized fruits since this is the case with D. kaki. Trees can start producing fruit when only a few years old, a specimen seen at Kew Botanical gardens in autumn 1996 was only 1.5 metres tall and was bearing a very large crop of fruit. This species is occasionally cultivated for its edible fruit; there are several named varieties. 'Dooley' grows well near the northern limits of persimmon culture. 'Geneva Red' also grows well at the northern limits of persimmon culture. The fruit is medium to large. 'Meader' grows well in cooler areas, it is self-fertile. Plants have a long tap root and are difficult to transplant, it is best to plant them out in their permanent position as soon as possible and to give protection over winter for the first year or two. The ssp. D. virginiana platycarpa has sweet succulent flesh, it grows wild from Missouri to Arkansas

Propagation: Seed - best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe. Stored seed requires cold-stratification and should be sown as early in the year as possible. It usually germinates in 1 - 6 months at 15°c. Pot up the young seedlings as soon as they are large enough to handle into fairly deep pots and plant them out in early summer. Give the plants some protection from winter cold for their first winter or two outdoors. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July August in a frame. Layering in spring

Common associates are elms (Ulmus spp.), eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana), hickories (Carya spp.), sugar maple (Acer saccharum), yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks Quercus spp.), boxelder (Acer negundo), red maple (A. rubrum), sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), and cedar elm (Ulmus crassifolia).

Common shrub and noncommercial tree associates include swamp-privet (Forestiera acuminata), roughleaf dogwood (Cornus drummondii), hawthorns (Crataegus spp.), water-elm (Planera aquatica), shining sumac (Rhus copallina), and smooth sumac (R. glabra).





Persimmon
Fruit





Persimmon
Tree



Persimmon
Bark



Persimmon
Branches with fruit and old bird\'s nest

Comment: Persimmon, Diospyros virginiana

Look for Persimmon on:
Google: Persimmon Wikipedia: Persimmon YouTube: Persimmon
Phylogenetic Tree of Life

Learn how to create a custom
Tree of Life





© Copyright 2006 - 2020 HealthyHomeGardening.com.
All Rights Reserved.
Web Design by Artatom