Home

Plants

Tree of Life

ID
  
 
Healthy Home Gardening
 
Pinyon Pine
Pinaceae
Pinus edulis


gardengeek
gardengeek
Type Categories Useful Parts

Tree



Pinaceae Family

Pinus Genus

Location

Amasa Valley, Delta, Utah


Compare Species
?

Pinaceae
Pinales
Pinales
Order of Pines
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

The pinyon pine nut (seed) species will take 18 months to complete its maturity, however, in order to reach full maturity the environmental conditions must be favorable for the tree and its fruit.
Development begins in early spring with pollinization. A tiny cone (small marble size) will form from mid spring to the end of summer in which the premature cone will then become and remain dormant (cessation of growth) until the following spring. The cone will then commence growth until it reaches maturity near or at the end of summer.
The mature pinyon pine cone and containing fruit is ready to harvest ten days before the green cone begins to open. A cone is harvested by placing it in a burlap bag and exposing it to a heat source such as the sun to begin the drying process. It takes approximately 20 days from that time until the cone fully opens. Once it is fully open and dry the fruit (seed) can be easily extracted in various ways. The most common and practical extracting method used is, to repeatedly hit the cone(s) in the burlap bag against a rough surface in order to cause it to shatter, leaving just the job of separating by hand the seed from the residue within the bag.
Another option for harvesting is to wait until the cone opens on the tree (as it naturally will) and harvest the cone from the pinyon pine, followed by the extracting process mentioned above.

Fallen seed can also be gathered beneath the trees.
In ecology, in regards to that of the pinyon pine tree, the elevation of the tree is an important determinant as to the quantity of pinecone production, and therefore, on the large part, will determine the amount of pine nuts the tree will yield.
Pinyon pine tree cone production is most commonly found at an elevation between 6,000 to 8,500 feet and ideally at 7,000 feet. This is due in fact that increased temperatures at elevations lower than 6,000 feet, during the spring, will dry up humidity and moisture contents (particularly snow packs), that provide for the tree throughout the spring and summer, causing little nourishment for pinecone maturity. Although there are several other environmental factors such as clouds and rain that determine the conditions of the ecology, without this nourishment (water) the cones are more susceptible to perishing and the tree will tend to abort the cone(s).

There are certain topographical areas found in lower elevations, such as shaded canyons, where the humidity remains constant throughout the spring and summer allowing the pinecones to fully mature and produce seed.
At elevations above 8,500 feet the temperature will substantially drop, drastically affecting the state of the dormant cone. During the winter, the change in temperature, along with gusty winds, with their severity, can cause the cone(s) to be susceptible to freezing that damages the fruit permanently, in which case, growth is stunted and the cone withers away.

Pine nuts contain, depending on species, between 1034% protein, with Stone Pine having the highest content.

They are also a source of dietary fiber. When first extracted from the pine cone, they are covered with a hard shell (seed coat), thin in some species, thick in others. The nutrition is storembryo (sporophyte) in the centre. Although a nut in the culinary sense, in the botanical sense pine nuts are seeds; being a gymnosperm, they lack a carpel (fruit) outside.
The shell must be removed before the pine nut can be eaten. Unshelled pine nuts have a long shelf life if kept dry and refrigerated (at 5 to +2 °C); shelled nuts (and unshelled nuts in warm conditions) deteriorate rapidly, becoming rancid within a few weeks or even days in warm humid conditions. Pine nuts are commercially available in shelled form, but due to poor storage, can have poor flavour and may be already rancid at the time of purchase.
European pine nuts may be distinguished from Asian ones by their greater length in comparison to girth; Asian pine nuts are stubbier, shaped somewhat like long kernels of corn. The American Pinyon nuts are known for their large size and ease of shelling. In the United States, P. edulis, the hard shell or New Mexico and Colorado became a sought after pine nut species due to the Trading Post System and the Navajo people who used the nuts as a means of commerce. The Italian pine nut, (P. pinea) was brought to the United States by immigrants and became a favored treat along the East Coast until the early 1930s when bumper crops of American Pine nuts were readily available at low prices.

Pine nuts can be pressed to extract pine nut oil, which is valued both for its mild, nutty flavour and its health benefits such as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant action.





Pinyon Pine




Pinyon Pine




Pinyon Pine




Pinyon Pine




Pinyon Pine




Pinyon Pine


Comment: Pinyon Pine, Pinus edulis

Look for Pinyon Pine on:
Google: Pinyon Pine Wikipedia: Pinyon Pine YouTube: Pinyon Pine
Phylogenetic Tree of Life

Learn how to create a custom
Tree of Life





© Copyright 2006 - 2019 HealthyHomeGardening.com.
All Rights Reserved.
Web Design by Artatom