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Seaside Goldenrod
Asteraceae
Solidago sempervirens


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb



Asteraceae Family

Solidago Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Evergreen Goldenrod, Aaron’s Rod


Location

It is native to eastern North America and parts of the Caribbean. S. sempervirens is a maritime plant, and is accordingly found along the ocean from Mexico north to Newfoundland. It is naturally found inland along the St. Lawrence Seaway and the Great Lakes, and has expanded its range further inland along roadsides over the past 30 years; also found inland to Illinois, Michigan, and Ohio.

Seaside Goldenrod is a coastal species found on beaches, dunes, and salt marshes.

Physical Description
Seaside goldenrod can be recognized by its fleshy, waxy leaves -- an adaptation to the drying effect of salt spray. Individual flower heads of seaside goldenrod are larger than those of the typical goldenrod.

S. sempervirens is a succulent, herbaceous perennial that reaches heights of 4–6 feet. Flowers are found in radiate heads, which make up a terminal, paniculiform inflorescence with recurved-secund branches. This species blooms in late summer and well into the fall. Its fruits are wind-dispersed achenes.




Compare Species
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Asteraceae
Asterales
Asterales
Star Order (Daisies)
Euasterids II
Euasterids II
Real Stars Group Two
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Introduced to Britain in 1699.

Medicinal Uses: Goldenrod has also been used as part of a tincture to aid in cleansing of the kidney bladder during a healing fast, in conjunction with Potassium broth and specific juices. A poultice is used for boils, burns, headache, toothache, wounds, and sores. Native Americans chewed the leaves to relieve sore throats and chewed the roots to relieve toothaches

Other Uses: Inventor Thomas Edison experimented with goldenrod to produce rubber, which it contains naturally. Edison created a fertilization and cultivation process to maximize the rubber content in each plant. His experiments produced a 12-foot-tall (3.7 m) plant that yielded as much as 12 percent rubber. The rubber produced through Edison's process was resilient and long lasting. The tires on the Model T given to him by his friend Henry Ford were made from goldenrod. Examples of the rubber can still be found in his laboratory, elastic and rot free after more than 50 years. However, even though Edison turned his research over to the U.S. government a year before his death, goldenrod rubber never went beyond the experimental stage.

Cultivation: An easily grown plant, it succeeds in any moderately fertile moisture retentive soil in sun or semi-shade. Likes sandy soils, and tolerates sea mists (with occasional inundations of seawater.

Propagation: Either scatter newly ripened seeds directly onto tilled or raked ground where they are to grow or save them and start them in the spring in a cold frame. Germination may be unreliable, so sow thickly. Barely cover the seeds and keep the planting medium moist. Prick out the seedlings and pot them up individually as soon as they are sturdy enough to handle. Keep them in pots through their first winter, and then set them out in late spring or summer. Clumps may be divided in spring or fall. Large divisions can go straight into the garden, but small plants are delicate and should be nurtured in pots until they are well developed, then set out in early summer. Be careful not to plant them more deeply than they originally grew or the stems may rot.





Seaside Goldenrod




Seaside Goldenrod




Seaside Goldenrod




Seaside Goldenrod
Entire plant in growing environment (Bethany Beach, Delaware)



Seaside Goldenrod


Comment: Seaside Goldenrod, Solidago sempervirens

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