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Healthy Home Gardening
 
Chicory
Asteraceae
Cichorium C. intybus


Producer
Producer
Flower Petal # 7+
Main Color    
Color 2    
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb




Asteraceae Family

Cichorium Genus
Other Names for this Plant

coffeeweed


Location

Originated in France and Italy.




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Asteraceae
Asterales
Asterales
Star Order (Daisies)
Euasterids II
Euasterids II
Real Stars Group Two
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Wikipedia:
Root chicory contains volatile oils similar to those found in plants in the related genus Tanacetum which includes Tansy, and is similarly effective at eliminating intestinal worms. All parts of the plant contain these volatile oils, with the majority of the toxic components concentrated in the plant's root.[16]

Chicory is well known for its toxicity to internal parasites. Studies indicate that ingestion of chicory by farm animals results in reduction of worm burdens,[17][18][19] which has prompted its widespread use as a forage supplement. Only a few major companies are active in research, development, and production of chicory varieties and selections, most in New Zealand.

Chicory (especially the flower), used as a folk medicine in Germany, is recorded in many books as an ancient German treatment for everyday ailments. It is variously used as a tonic and as a treatment for gallstones, gastro-enteritis, sinus problems and cuts and bruises. (Howard M. 1987). Chicory contains inulin,[20] which may help humans with weight loss, constipation, improving bowel function, and general health.[21] In rats, it may increase calcium absorption and bone mineral density.[20]

Chicory has demonstrated antihepatotoxic potential in animal studies.



Unknown blue flower




Unknown blue flower




Unknown blue flower


Comment: Chicory, Cichorium C. intybus

Page Posts: 2

Producer
Producer
June 13, 2012
Aster, ah, should have recognized the stigmas.

I may try the roots, thanks.
gardengeek
gardengeek
June 13, 2012
Chicory

Family: Asteraceae

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