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Royal Burgundy Bean
Fabaceae
Phaseolus vugaris


lorincook
lorincook

Fabaceae Family

Phaseolus Genus
Physical Description
16-20 in. plant height, 5-6 in. pod
Tender Annual


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Fabaceae
Bean Family
Fabales
Fabales
Order of Beans
NOX Clad
Nitrogen Bean Clad
Oxid-Faba
Fabidae
Bean-Like Class
Eurosids
Real Rose Class
Rosids
Rosids
Rose-Like Class
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Deep-purple pods are delicious, round, and stringless, supported by a 16-20" stocky and durable bush. Prolific producer even in cooler conditions. Color fades when cooked.
Planting Depth: 3 4-1.5"
Soil Temp. for Germ.: 70-85°F
Days to Germ.: 6-12
Avg. Spacing: 8-12 seeds ft. in rows 24-36 in. apart
Avg. Seeding Rate: 75-110 lbs. acre
Days to Maturity: 50-55
Full Sun
Moderate Water
Blanch Royal Burgundy beans for two minutes and they turn green. Vivid burgundy pods are 5 in. long and amaze all who see them. Royal Burgundy germinates in cool soil and resists beetles.
High yield, low maintenance. Bush beans grow upright and do not require staking. If picked on a daily basis, they yield about 7 lbs. in 2-3 weeks from a 15 ft. row. If Mexican bean beetles area problem, spray plants with Pyola. Grow both green and yellow varieties for a pretty, two-toned bean salad!



Royal Burgundy Bean - Plant
Royal Burgundy Bean - Plant - May 23, 2009



Royal Burgundy Bean - Plant
Royal Burgundy Bean - Plant - May 23, 2009



Royal Burgundy Bean - Plant
Royal Burgundy Bean - Plant - May 23, 2009



Royal Burgundy Bean - Plant
Royal Burgundy Bean - Plant - May 22, 2009



Royal Burgundy Bean - Plant
Royal Burgundy Bean - Plant - May 22, 2009

Comment: Royal Burgundy Bean, Phaseolus vugaris

Page Posts: 3

lorincook
lorincook
April 08, 2010


Beans are some of the few vegetables that you can harvest at any time....the younger, the more tender and sweet they will be....the larger they get, you may want to cook before eating them....

lorincook
lorincook
July 26, 2009
Beans are generally eaten in one of two ways, as a snap bean or as a dry bean. Eating it as a snap bean means that the bean is eaten before it is completely mature, and will therefore have softer flesh, with small, soft, and underdeveloped beans inside the pod. Dry beans go to full maturity, characterized by large, round-looking bumps that run through the length of the pod. If any type of bean reaches full maturity, it is often so desirable to eat the pods, since the flesh becomes harder and somewhat leathery.
You can eat snap beans at any point in their development, even when they are very small....the smaller the more tender the bean will be, so it's sort of a trade-off between tenderness and size when choosing how long to let a snap mature.

If you plan to use a bean as a dry bean, they may be picked when the pods reach maturity and begin to wilt and dry out. Some dry beans may be left on the plant to dry there, but don't leave them too long, or the beans will fall out of the pods when the pods become fully dry.
Royal Burgundy beans are most often eaten as a snap bean.

Caroline

Monroe, NC July 11, 2009
How do you know when they are ready to harvest?

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