Home

Plants

Tree of Life

ID
  
 
Healthy Home Gardening
 
Chicken of the Woods
Polyporaceae
Laetiporus sulphureus


lorincook
lorincook

Polyporaceae Family

Laetiporus Genus

Location

Mostly grows out of trees and logs....if the infected tree happens to be alive....
too bad for the tree..it won't be for long...but you'll have some tasty food if that is any consolation......

Physical Description
Fruiting Body: 5-60 cm broad, up to 4 cm thick; fan-shaped to obtusely semicircular; smooth to gently wrinkled; suedelike; bright yellow to bright orange when young, frequently fading in maturity and with direct sunlight.
Pores: Tightly packed and nearly invisible when young; sulfur yellow; sometimes bruising darker.

Flesh: Thick; soft and watery when young, becoming tough, eventually crumbling away; white to pale yellow.

Spore Print: White.

Microscopic Features: Spores 5-7 x 3.5-5 µ; smooth; broadly elliptical to round.


Compare Species
?

Polyporaceae
Polyporaceae
Many Pores Family
Polyporales
Polyporales
Many Pores Order
Agaricomycetes
Agaricomycetes
Gill Class
Agaricomycotina
Agaricomycotina
Gill Subdivision
Basidiomycota
Basidiomycota
Spore Pedestal Division
Dikarya
Dikarya
Two Nuclei Cells
Fungi
Fungi
Fungus
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Commonly known as sulphur shelf, chicken of the woods, the chicken mushroom, or the chicken fungus because many think they taste like chicken. The name "chicken of the woods" also refers to the edible polypore, Maitake (Grifola frondosa).

[ Basidiomycetes > Polyporales > Polyporaceae > Laetiporus . . . ]

below by Michael Kuo.....

Often called the "chicken of the woods," Laetiporus sulphureus is easily recognized by its colors, soft texture, and absence of gills. Recent mycological "splitting" has resulted in an array of species spanning North America, nearly all of which formerly "passed" as Laetiporus sulphureus. See the comments below for some of the details.

Description:

Ecology: Parasitic and saprobic; growing alone or, more typically, in large clusters on decaying logs and stumps of hardwoods and conifers; summer and fall, rarely in winter and spring; widely distributed as a species cluster, but the "true" Laetiporus sulphureus may be limited to areas east of the Rocky Mountains (see below). Laetiporus sulphurues causes a reddish brown cubical heart rot, with thin areas of white mycelium visible in the cracks of the wood. The mushrooms do not appear until well after the fungus has attacked the tree; by the time the chickens appear, they are definitely coming home to roost, as far as the tree's health is concerned.






Chicken of the Woods - Plant
Chicken of the Woods - Plant - June 06, 2009



Chicken of the Woods - Plant
Chicken of the Woods - Plant - June 06, 2009

Comment: Chicken of the Woods, Laetiporus sulphureus

Look for Chicken of the Woods on:
Google: Chicken of the Woods Wikipedia: Chicken of the Woods YouTube: Chicken of the Woods
Phylogenetic Tree of Life

Learn how to create a custom
Tree of Life





© Copyright 2006 - 2020 HealthyHomeGardening.com.
All Rights Reserved.
Web Design by Artatom