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Healthy Home Gardening

Virginia Creeper

Vitaceae Parthenocissus quinquefolia

tobolonoble
tobolonoble
Type Categories Useful Parts
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Virginia Creeper

Main Order Diagram | Plant Order List

Vitaceae Family
Grape Virginia Creeper Green Grapes Fox Grape Blue Grapes Wine Grapes

Parthenocissus Genus
Virginia Creeper
Other Names for this Plant

American ivy, Woodbine, and Ampelopsis


Location

This plant prefers conditions very similar to poison ivy and often will grow along side it. Thrives in a wide range of environments, including salty and acidic soils. It will grow to great heights, this is the vine you'll often notice climbing telephone poles on its own.

Physical Description
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What's This?

Vitaceae
Vitaceae
Grape Family
Rosids
Rosids
Rose-Like Class
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus
General Information

Woody deciduous flowering vine. Although they do flower, these flowering vine plants are grown for their foliage. In the Eastern U.S. this specimen is a native, making it easy to grow there.

Virginia Creeper is often misidentified as Poison Ivy and Poison Oak. This is especially in the Spring as leaves are red early before turning green and when begins only has 3 leaves (like Poison Ivy), but the Vigrinia Creeper fully leafed will have 5 leaves. Leaves are generally long and toothed and morph to brilliant colors in fall, ranging from red to burgundy.
Virginia creeper vine can also be grown as a groundcover to provide a stretch of smooth, low-maintenance foliage in the garden.
Growing Virginia creeper up the walls of any buildings, make sure you desire it as a permanent fixture. Once Virginia creeper gets a toehold, it is difficult to remove it from its supporting structure and can do damage to a wall if you decide to attempt to remove the stronghold on a entrenched plant.
It is better to let Virginia creeper creep on the dirt as a ground cover, unless you are sure that you want it as permanent stronghold plant on your wall.
Virginia creepers will also climb trees and cast shade on the trees' foliage, thus depriving them of needed sunlight, do not allow it to climb any trees that you enjoy.

Virginia Creeper, American ivy, Woodbine, and Ampelopsis

Virginia Creeper, American ivy, Woodbine, and Ampelopsis
Virginia Creeper, American ivy, Woodbine, and Ampelopsis - August 15, 2009

Virginia Creeper, American ivy, Woodbine, and Ampelopsis

Virginia Creeper, American ivy, Woodbine, and Ampelopsis
Virginia Creeper, American ivy, Woodbine, and Ampelopsis - August 15, 2009

Virginia Creeper, American ivy, Woodbine, and Ampelopsis

Virginia Creeper, American ivy, Woodbine, and Ampelopsis
Virginia Creeper, American ivy, Woodbine, and Ampelopsis - August 15, 2009

Comment: Virginia Creeper, Parthenocissus quinquefolia

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