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Choke Cherry
Rosaceae
Prunus virginiana


gardengeek
gardengeek
Flower Petal # 5
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Color 2    
Type Categories Useful Parts

Tree

Rosaceae Family

Prunus Genus

Location

native to North America, where it is found almost throughout the continent except for the deep south and the far north.




Choke Cherry , Prunus virginiana - YouTube.com

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Rosaceae
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Order of Roses
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Fabidae
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General Information


Called the Choke Cherry because it dries your mouth out.

The bark of chokecherry root was once made into an asperous-tasting concoction used to ward off or treat colds, fever and stomach maladies by native Americans[7] The chokecherry fruit can be used to make a tasty jam, jelly, or syrup, but the bitter nature of the fruit means you need a lot of sugar to sweeten the preserves.

Chokecherry is toxic to horses, especially after the leaves have wilted (such as after a frost or after branches have been broken) because wilting releases cyanide and makes the plant sweet. About 5-10 kg of foliage can be fatal. Symptoms of a horse that has been poisoned include heavy breathing, agitation, and weakness.




Wild Cherry
Wild Cherry - September 18, 2009



Wild Cherry
Wild Cherry - September 18, 2009



Wild Cherry
Wild Cherry - September 18, 2009

Comment: Choke Cherry , Prunus virginiana

Page Posts: 4


maureen

Parker,CO,USA August 30, 2010
thanks for this explanation. In the mountains near Craig most people are calling berries "chokecherries" while I think they are black cherries.
gardengeek
gardengeek
August 18, 2010
Dale,

I really appreciate your help, but I think these are chokecherries. I think they weren't ripe yet, and the camera was very close to them. I would like to get it right though, so I will try to find images etc of the chokecherry and the nanking cherries like you suggested.
images.google.com images?q=Prunus virginiana
Thank you for your help!

Dale Lee Evans

Cheyenne, WY, USA August 12, 2010
Also it should be noted that the pits of chokecherries, if eaten significant quantities, can cause cyanide poisoning. So, don't crush those pits when you're making wine or jam!

Dale Lee Evans

Cheyenne, WY, USA August 12, 2010
I believe the fruit shown here are actually Nanking cherries. Chokecherries are smaller and much darker when ripe.

Look for Choke Cherry on:
Google: Choke Cherry Wikipedia: Choke Cherry YouTube: Choke Cherry
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