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Oxalis
Oxalidaceae
Oxalis


heidbenati
heidbenati
Type Categories Useful Parts

Shrub



Oxalidaceae Family

Oxalis Genus

Location

Brazil - Santos


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Oxalidaceae
Oxalidales
Oxalidales
Oxid Clad
Oxid-Faba
Fabidae
Bean-Like Class
Eurosids
Real Rose Class
Rosids
Rosids
Rose-Like Class
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

The edible tubers of the Oca (O. tuberosa), somewhat similar to a small potato, have long been cultivated for food in Colombia and elsewhere in the northern Andes mountains of South America. The leaves of Scurvy-grass Sorrel (O. enneaphylla) were eaten by sailors travelling around Patagonia as a source of vitamin C to avoid scurvy.

A characteristic of many members of this genus is that they contain oxalic acid (whose name references the genus), giving the leaves and flowers a sour taste, refreshing to chew in small amounts[2]. However, in large amounts these species are toxic, interfering with proper digestion and kidney function. In India, Creeping Woodsorrel (O. corniculata) is only eaten seasonally, starting December January. The leaves of Common Wood-sorrel (O. acetosella) are commonly thought[citation needed] to make a very good tea when dried.

In the past, it was a practice to extract crystals of calcium oxalate for use in treating diseases and as a salt called sal acetosella or "sorrel salt" (also known as "salt of lemon"). Growing Oca tuber root caps are covered in a fluorescent slush rich in harmaline and harmine which apparently suppresses pests; this phenomenon has been studied to some extent at the Colorado State University. Creeping Wood-sorrel and perhaps other species are apparently hyperaccumulators of copper. The Ming Dynasty text Precious Secrets of the Realm of the King of Xin from 1421 describes how O. corniculata can be used to locate copper deposits as well as for geobotanical prospecting. It thus ought to have some potential for phytoremediation of contaminated soils.

Several species are grown as pot plants or as ornamental plants in gardens. Species with four regular leaflets in particular O. tetraphylla (Four-leaved Pink-sorrel) are sometimes misleadingly sold as "four-leaf clover", taking advantage of the mystical status of four-leaf clovers. The Taiwanese girl group S.H.E uses a wood-sorrel trefoil as an emblem, placing it for example on each of their album covers.



3 Leaf Clover
Oxalis - October 25, 2009



3 Leaf Clover
Oxalis - October 25, 2009



3 Leaf Clover
Oxalis - October 25, 2009



3 Leaf Clover
Oxalis - October 25, 2009

Comment: Oxalis, Oxalis

Page Posts: 1

gardengeek
gardengeek
October 29, 2009
That looks like an Oxalis

Look for Oxalis on:
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