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ID
  
 
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Yellow Wild Iris
Iridaceae
Dietes bicolor


heidbenati
heidbenati
Flower Petal # 6
Main Color    
Color 2    
Type Categories Useful Parts

Shrub

Iridaceae Family

Dietes Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Fortnight lily, African iris, Morea or Moraea iris, Japanese iris and Butterfly iris


Location



Most species are native to southern Africa, with one {D. robinsoniana) native to Lord Howe Island off the coast of Australia.


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Iridaceae
Asparagales
Asparagales
Monocots
Monocots
One First-Leaves (Monocots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Species include:
Dietes species:

* Dietes bicolor (Yellow Wild Iris, Peacock Flower, Butterfly Iris)

* Dietes grandiflora (Wild Iris, Large Wild Iris, Fairy Iris)

* Dietes iridioides (Wild Iris, African Iris, Cape Iris, Fortnight Lily, Morea Iris)

* Dietes robinsoniana (Wedding Lily)

D. bicolor has cream or yellow flowers.

D. grandiflora and D. iridioides both have white flowers marked with yellow and violet, and appear similar in photographs, but they are quite different: those of grandiflora are much larger, last three days, and have dark spots at the base of the outer tepals, while those of iridioides are small, last only one day, and lack the spots. D. grandiflora is also a larger plant overall.

Dietes bicolor is a clump-forming rhozomatous perennial plant with long sword-like pale-green leaves, growing from multiple fans at the base of the clump. It can form large clumps if left undisturbed for years. This species is common in horticulture in its native South Africa, where it is often used in public gardens, beautification of commercial premises and along roadsides.

The blooms are yellow with three dark purple spots, each surrounded by an orange outline, and are followed by a capsule that may bend the flower stalks to the ground. Ripe seeds (dark brown in colour) are dispersed when the capsule dries and splits.

The leaves of Dietes bicolor are narrower than those of Dietes grandiflora and Dietes iridioides, and tend to arch more.

The spots on the flowers sometimes appear so dark as to seem black.



Yellow Wild Iris or Peacock Flower


Comment: Yellow Wild Iris, Dietes bicolor

Look for Yellow Wild Iris on:
Google: Yellow Wild Iris Wikipedia: Yellow Wild Iris YouTube: Yellow Wild Iris
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