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Bearded Iris
Iridaceae
Iris germanica


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb



Iridaceae Family

Iris Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Iris, Flag, German Iris, and Orrisroot


Location

Native of Southern Europe

Physical Description
Each is composed of six perianth segments: three outer sepals called "falls", alternating with three inner petals, called "standards." Each sepal is bedecked with a tuft of hairs down its inner midline: the "beard." The beard hairs are usually white with yellow tips. The flowers are pleasantly fragrant and come with white, purple, yellow or blue perianth segments. There can be as many as half a dozen flowers on a stalk. The flowering stalk may stand up to 3 ft (1 m) tall. The sword shaped leaves are mostly basal, in two ranks, and about 2 ft (60 cm) long. German iris spreads by rhizomes; it does not produce a bulb. German iris is a widely cultivated plant and hundreds (thousands?) of hybrids and cultivars are available


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Iridaceae
Asparagales
Asparagales
Monocots
Monocots
One First-Leaves (Monocots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

In Tuscany and other parts of Italy, large districts are given over to the cultivation of these three Irises. They are also cultivated, but only to a slight degree, in other parts of Europe, in Morocco and in India.

The planting of the Orris root in Tuscany - locally known as 'giaggiolo' - is a matter of great importance. When the Iris begins to grow, the ground is carefully and systematically weeded, this being chiefly done by women, who traverse the rows of the plants barefoot, hoeing up the weeds; whole families of peasants work together at this, and in the subsequent collection, trimming and drying of the roots.

Medicinal Uses: The root is diuretic, emetic, expectorant, and mildly purgative. Another report says that the juice of the fresh root is a strong purge of great efficiency in the treatment of dropsy. In the past, sections of the dried root have been given to teething babies to chew on, though this has been discontinued for hygienic reasons. Roots of plants 2 - 3 years old are dug up after flowering and are then dried for later use

Food Uses: The root is dried and used as a flavoring

Other Notes: The root is a source of Orris powder, which has the scent of violets. It is obtained by grinding up the dried root. It is much used as a fixative in perfumery and pot-pourri, as an ingredient of toothpastes, breath fresheners etc and as a food flavoring.

The juice of the root is sometimes used as a cosmetic and also for the removal of freckles from the skin.

A black dye is obtained from the root. A blue dye is obtained from the flowers.

The seeds are used as rosary beads

It should be no surprise that the kings of France selected Bearded Iris (Iris germanica) as their emblem, the fleur-de-lis

It was dedicated to Juno and was the origin of the scepter, the Egyptians placing it on the brow of the Sphinx and on the scepter of their kings, the three leaves of its blossoms typifying faith, wisdom and valor.

In the Japanese mythology, Iris is supposed to be a symbol of warrior and a flower of May.





Bearded Iris




Bearded Iris




Bearded Iris




Bearded Iris


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