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Catalpa Tree
Bignoniaceae
Catalpa speciosa


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Tree


Bignoniaceae Family

Catalpa Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Catawba Tree, Northern Catalpa, Indian Bean Tree and Cigar Tree


Location

Origin & Range: Native to warm temperate regions of North America, the West Indies, and eastern Asia.Prior to European settlement it was native to a small area of the central Mississippi Valley basin, western Tennessee, north east Arkansas, the lowlands of south east Mississippi and southern Illinois and Indiana. It is now readily found from Kansas south to Texas and eastward to Louisiana.

Physical Description
Catalpas typically grow to 12-18 m (40-60 ft) tall and 6-12 m (20-40 ft) wide. A 10-year-old sapling will stand about 6 m (20 ft) tall. They can be recognized by their large heart-shaped to three-lobed leaves, showy white or yellow flowers in broad panicles, and in the autumn by their 20-50 cm long fruits which resemble a slender bean pod, containing numerous small flat seeds, each seed having two thin wings to aid wind dispersal. Because of the leaves, they are sometimes confused for Tung trees in the south U.S.


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Bignoniaceae
Lamiales
Lamiales
Tounge Order (Mints)
Euasterids I
Euasterids I
Real Stars Group One
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Historically catalpa wood has been valued for manufacturing fence posts. The northern catalpa is considered invasive in many areas. Untrimmed trees may produce undesirable amounts of debris
The bark of this tree has been used as a quinine substitute in the treatment of malaria and also as an antidote to snake bites.
Pioneer doctors used the seedpods and seed to make a decoction for chronic bronchial infections, spasmodic asthma, labored breathing, and heart conditions. The Juice from either the leaves or roots was used to treat swelling of the eye or cutaneous infections. Green leaves were crushed and placed on swollen lymph gland. The bark was dried, then ground up into a powder and taken or brewed into a decoction and taken fro swollen lymph glands
In Japan -- the magical bow Azusa-Yumi is called the "bow made from the catalpa tree". This goes back to an ancient Chinese tradition of magic regarding the appeasement of the souls of the dead. Furthermore the Hama-Yumi, the "evil-destroying bow" is used in numerous ceremonies in Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines, and is set up in a place of honor or on the home shrine where it protects private households from evil influences.
The largest living Catalpa tree is on the lawn of the Michigan State capitol and was planted in the year of its dedication.



Catalpa Tree
Flowers closeup



Catalpa Tree
Flowers



Catalpa Tree
Flower from the side



Catalpa Tree
Trunk of Tree



Catalpa Tree
Seedpods



Catalpa Tree
Older Tree



Catalpa Tree
Bark of an older tree

Comment: Catalpa Tree, Catalpa speciosa

Page Posts: 1

raspirate
raspirate
June 09, 2010


These are such beautiful trees. At my old house I had one. I wished I could take it along to my new house, but just wishful thinking. Enjoy it!

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