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Crab Apple
Rosaceae
Malus sylvestris


Thunder
Thunder
Flower Petal # 5
Main Color    
Color 2    
Type Categories Useful Parts

Tree



Rosaceae Family

Malus Genus

Location

Native to western Asia

Physical Description
Low round-crowned tree, up to 15 m tall; stems more or less thorny, tomentose or heavily pubescent when young; leaves clustered on pubescent spur branches, ovate, elliptical or suborticular, crenate or serrate, cordate or rounded at base, 315 cm long, 2.55.5 cm wide, shortly apiculate; flower on spurs in clusters along the fruiting section of the branch, white or pink, 34 cm in diameter; sepals 37 mm long, glabrous outside, tomentose on inside; styles glabrous or sparsely villous at base; fruits variable as to size, color and shape, depending on the variety, with subglabrous skin, wide edible fleshy portion, and a core of 5 carpels, each containing one or more seeds; seeds brown, obovoid.


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Rosaceae
Rosales
Rosales
Order of Roses
NOX Clad
Nitrogen Bean Clad
Oxid-Faba
Fabidae
Bean-Like Class
Eurosids
Real Rose Class
Rosids
Rosids
Rose-Like Class
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

It was brought to North America by 1800 and because of its wide variety of uses quickly spread throughout the north and northeast. It was brought to North America by travelers from Europe and spread throughout the North and Northeast by the famed Johnny Appleseed.

Medicinal Uses: The fruit is astringent and laxative. The crushed fruit pulp can be used as a poultice to heal inflammations or small flesh wounds. The fruit is eaten to obviate constipation. The bark, and especially the root bark, is anthelmintic, refrigerant, and soporific. An infusion is used in the treatment of intermittent, remittent, and bilious fevers. The leaves contain up to 2.4% of an antibacterial substance called 'florin'. This inhibits the growth of a number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in as low a concentration as 30 ppm

Regarded as aperitif, bactericide, carminative, cyanogenetic, depuretives, digestive, diuretic, emollient, hypnotic, laxative, POISON, refrigerant, sedative, and tonic. Apple is said to be a folk remedy for bilious ailments, cacoethes, cancer, catarrh, diabetes, dysentery, fever, flux, heart, malaria, pertussis, scurvy, spasm, thirst, and warts. (Duke and Wain, 1981) In Europe scraped apple has been used extensively to treat infant intestinal disorders, such as diarrhea, dysentery, and dyspepsia. Root and bark are considered anthelmintic, hypnotic, and refrigerant, and a bark infusion is given Indians suffering from bilious ailments, intermittent and remittent fevers. Apple leaves contain an antibacterial substance called phloretin, which is active in doses as low as 30 ppm. Fruit eaten to obviate constipation.

Food Uses: Apples are very nutritious and it is a common idea that "an apple a day, keeps the doctor away"

Fruit - raw or cooked. Used for jellies, preserves, and juices. The flavor improves considerably if the fruit is not harvested until it has been frosted. The fruit is quite variable in size (it is about 2 - 4cm in diameter) and quality. Whilst usually harsh and acid, some forms are quite sweet and can be eaten out of hand. The fruit is rich in pectin and can be used in helping other fruits to set when making jam etc. Pectin is also said to protect the body against radiation. Edible oil can be obtained from the seed. It would only really be viable to use these seeds as an oil source if the fruit was being used for some purpose such as making cider and then the seeds could be extracted from the remaining pulp. A very pleasant tea can be made from the leaves

Apples are most valued as a fresh desert fruit, and may be made into jams, jellies, wines, ciders, vinegars, fresh juice, applesauces, apple butter, brandies, pies and cakes. They may also be baked, fried, stewed, spiced, candied, or used in mincemeat or chutney.

Other Notes: The fruit is a source of pectin. Pectin is used as a thickener in jams etc and as a culture medium in laboratories.

A red to yellow dye is obtained from the bark. Bark yields yellow to yellow-tan with no mordant.

The wood is an excellent fuel; the hard wood is used for turnery, canes, and pipes. Apples are a good detergent food for cleaning teeth.

The oil from the seeds is used for cooking and illumination.





Crab Apple




Crab Apple




Crab Apple
bark

Comment: Crab Apple, Malus sylvestris

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