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Dumbcane
Araceae
Dieffenbachia seguine


heidbenati
heidbenati
Type Categories Useful Parts

Shrub


Araceae Family

Dieffenbachia Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Dumb Cane, Comigo Ninguém Pode


Location

São Paulo, Brazil



Physical Description
Dieffenbachia is a genus of tropical plants in the Family Araceae noted for their patterned leaves. Members of this genus are popular as houseplants because of their tolerance for shade. The name commemorates Ernst Dieffenbach, a German physician.


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Araceae
Alismatales
Alismatales
Monocots
Monocots
One First-Leaves (Monocots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Dieffenbachia plants can grow outdoors in tropical climates, but specimens kept as houseplants must be kept indoors during most of the year outside the tropics. Temperatures below about 5˚C (40˚F) can kill the plant. The plant needs light but filtered sunlight through a window is usually sufficient. When the plant is brought home from the nursery, it will likely need repotting. The plant needs moderately moist soil. The soil should be fertilized with either regular liquid fertilizing or fertilizer pellets or spikes. Leaves will periodically roll up and fall off to make way for new leaves. Yellowing of the leaves is generally a sign of problematic conditions, such as a nutrient deficiency in the soil. Dieffenbachia responds well to hot temperatures and dry climates.

The cells of the Dieffenbachia plant contain needle-shaped calcium oxalate crystals called raphides. If a leaf is chewed, these crystals can cause a temporary burning sensation and erythema. In rare cases, edema of tissues exposed to the plant have been reported. Mastication and ingestion generally result in only mild symptoms. With both children and pets, contact with dieffenbachia (typically from chewing) can cause a host of unpleasant symptoms, including oral irritation, excessive drooling, and localized swelling. However, these effects are rarely life-threatening. In most cases, symptoms are mild, and can be successfully treated with analgesic agents, antihistamines, or medical charcoal. Gastric evacuation or lavage is "seldom" indicated. Jennifer S. Boyle, MD, PharmD, and Christopher P Holstege, MD, note that, "In a large retrospective study of 188 patients with plant oxalate exposure, all cases were determined to be minor and all resolved with minor or no treatment." They also note that, "In patients with exposure to toxic plants, 70% are children younger than 5 years."



Dumbcane, Dumb Cane, Comigo Ninguém Pode
Dumbcane, Dumb Cane, Comigo Ninguém Pode - December 14, 2009



Dumbcane, Dumb Cane, Comigo Ninguém Pode
Dumbcane, Dumb Cane, Comigo Ninguém Pode - December 14, 2009



Dumbcane, Dumb Cane, Comigo Ninguém Pode
Dumbcane, Dumb Cane, Comigo Ninguém Pode - December 14, 2009



Dumbcane, Dumb Cane, Comigo Ninguém Pode
Dumbcane, Dumb Cane, Comigo Ninguém Pode - December 14, 2009

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