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Impala Lily
Apocynaceae
Adenium multiflorum


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Tree



Apocynaceae Family

Adenium Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Impalalelie, Sabi star, Desert Rose


Location

Native to South Africa. The natural distribution range of Adenium multiflorum extends from southeastern Zambia, through Malawi, Zimbabwe and Mozambique, to Limpopo, Mpumalanga and the northern parts of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa, and Swaziland.

Physical Description
Adenium multiflorum is a deciduous succulent shrub or small tree, 0.5-3 m tall, the shape resembling a miniature baobab. Stems arise from a large underground rootstock. The bark is shiny grey to brown, with poisonous watery latex. For most of the year the plants do not have flowers or leaves. The leaves are up to 100 mm long, shiny green above and pale below, usually much broader towards the tip, and are carried in clusters at the growing tips of the branches. They are shed before flowering.

The flowers are borne in terminal inflorescences, each flower 50-70 mm in diameter. They vary greatly in color, usually with pointed white lobes, crinkly red margins and red stripes in the throat. Plants with pure white flowers are occasionally found. The flowers are sweetly scented. Flowering occurs from May to September. The fruit is usually paired, cylindrical follicles up to 240 mm long. The seeds are brown with a tuft of silky hairs.




Compare Species
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Apocynaceae
Gentianales
Gentianales
Euasterids I
Euasterids I
Real Stars Group One
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

This member of the Apocynaceae family was given this name by Johann Friedrich Klotzsch in 1861. It is found in Zambia, Malawi, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, South Africa and Swaziland, growing in sandy or other well drained soil with some water and some to lots of sun. The flowers are from white to white and red

Cultivation: Adenium multiflorum grows well in warm, well-drained situations where the soil is sandy. In the garden they are not plants for cold or damp areas. They are ideal subjects for a dry rockery, giving a warm colourful display of bright flowers in winter. As container plants they may be kept in cooler places, but do not water them when they are dormant and protect the plants against frost.

Water the plants well during hot weather. Keep the potting mix wet in temperatures of 30º C. Plants require high light intensity and temperatures of around 30º C, hot weather preferably accompanied by moderate to high humidity. Plants respond well to regular and generous fertilizing. Add slow-release fertilizer and micronutrients to potting mediums. Inadequate watering and feeding are the primary causes for slow growth in adeniums.

Adeniums must be grown in containers in climates with frost or cool, wet winters. Dormancy can be detected when water consumption declines or when the leaves suddenly turn yellow: watering should then be drastically reduced and stopped when the plants are in full dormancy. Expanding terminal buds will signal the end of dormancy and watering can then be increased. Plants need ample root space for rapid growth. The growth of root-bound plants is greatly inhibited and plants should therefore frequently be re-potted until they reach the desired size. The potting mix must provide excellent drainage and aeration. Over-watering and fertilization combined with inadequate light or poor air movement may lead to weak, elongated growth. Adeniums are surprisingly adaptable to cultivation-this adaptation includes adjusting their growth cycles to match the reversed seasons in the northern hemisphere (Rowley 1999). Care should be taken to avoid damage to the fleshy, brittle roots, as when repotting.

Propagation: Propagation is by seed (the only means in the wild) and vegetative propagation by cuttings or grafting. Larger plants can be obtained from nurseries. Cuttings should preferably be tip-cuttings dipped in a rooting hormone and stuck into a coarse rooting medium and kept well watered. Grafting is also an effective method and more reliable than cuttings. Growing from seed is easy-seeds germinate in about a week at 30º C. Treating seeds with a fungicide before sowing reduces loss. Seedlings usually grow through the first winter before obligate dormancy appears.

Other Notes:The latex is used as an arrow poison and as a fish stunning poison. Used in magic potions in Africa

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Warning: Due to alkaloids present in the milky latex of the flowers and leaves, this plant is considered toxic to Cows, fish and humans



Impala Lily




Impala Lily
Leaves & Flower buds



Impala Lily
Young tree



Impala Lily
Swollen trunk

Comment: Impala Lily, Adenium multiflorum

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