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Japanese Honeysuckle
Caprifoliaceae
Lonicera japonica


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Type Categories Useful Parts

Vine





Caprifoliaceae Family

Lonicera Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Chin Yin Hua, Chin Yin T'Eng, Honeysuckle, Japanese Honeysuckle, Jen Tung, Jen Tung Chiu, Jen Tung Kao, Sui-Kazura, Yin Hua, Hall's Honeysuckle, White honeysuckle, Chinese honeysuckle, Halliana, Woodbine, Goat's Leaf, Kin-yin-keva


Location

Origin & Range: Native to E. Asia - China, Japan, Korea. Now naturalized in Britain and the US from southern New York and New Jersey south to southern Florida and west to southwestern Texas. Inland it is distributed from Pennsylvania and West Virginia west to Missouri, Kansas, and Oklahoma. Widespread in the eastern and southern United States.

Physical Description
Japanese honeysuckle is an extremely vigorous twining and trailing woody vine that can grow more than 30 ft (9.1 m) in length. The leaves are in pairs opposite each other along the stem and are deciduous in cold climates, evergreen in milder areas. They are elliptic to oval, 2-3 in (5-7.6 in) long and half as wide. The flowers are about an i1.5 in (2.8 cm) long, tubular with two widely spreading lips, and borne in pairs. Japanese honeysuckle blooms throughout the entire growing season. The flowers start out white, sometimes tinged with purple, and age to yellow in their second day. They are extremely fragrant. The fruits are blue-black berries about 0.25 in (0.6 cm) in diameter.


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Caprifoliaceae
Dipsacales
Dipsacales
Thirsty Order (Teasel)
Euasterids II
Euasterids II
Real Stars Group Two
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

This plant is considered an invasive species in most of North America, it will take over and eliminate native honeysuckles.
The entire plant has been used as an alternative medicine for thousands of years in Asia. An ointment made from the leaves of honeysuckles was used to remove freckles, whereas a bouquet of flowers was used to relieve asthma.

It is alterative, antibacterial, antiinflammatory, antispasmodic, depurative, diuretic, febrifuge, and is also used to reduce blood pressure. The stems are used internally in the treatment of acute rheumatoid arthritis, mumps and hepatitis. The stems and flowers are used together a medicinal infusion in the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections (including pneumonia) and dysentery. An infusion of the flower buds is used in the treatment of a wide range of ailments including syphillitic skin diseases and tumors, bacterial dysentery, colds, and enteritis.
High in Calcium, Magnesium, and Potassium, the leaves can be parboiled and eaten as a vegetable. The edible buds and flowers, made into a syrup or puddings. Honeysuckle flowers can be used to flavor wine, syrup, sorbet, and other sweet dishes.
: Ingestion of the berries in large quantities is reported to cause sickness that may lead to a coma. Gastrointestinal discomfort and muscle cramps especially in children




Japanese Honeysuckle


Comment: Japanese Honeysuckle, Lonicera japonica

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