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Lemon
Rutaceae
Citrus ×limon


Thunder
Thunder
Flower Petal # 5
Main Color    
Color 2    
Type Categories Useful Parts

Tree



Rutaceae Family

Citrus Genus

Location

Indigenous to Northern India

Physical Description
The Lemon is a small, straggling tree about 11 feet high, irregularly branched, the bark varying in color from clear grey on the trunk, green on the younger branches to a purplish color on the twigs. The evergreen leaves are ovate-oval, about two inches long, the margin serrate with sharp spines in the axils of the stalks. The solitary, five petaled flowers, white inside and tinged with deep pink outside, grow on stems in the axils. The reproductive tissue surrounds the seed of the angiosperm lemon tree. The well-known fruit is an ovoid berry, about three inches long, nipple-shaped at the end, smooth, bright yellow, indented over the oil-glands, having an acid, pale yellow pulp. About forty-seven varieties have been developed during the centuries of cultivation.

The peel, Limonis Cortex, is white and spongy inside, varying much in thickness, and the yellow outer layer, formerly called the flavedo, has a fragrant odor and aromatic, bitter taste. Only the fresh rind is official.




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Rutaceae
Sapindales
Sapindales
Soapberry Order
Eumalvids
Real Mallows
Malvidae
Mallow Class
Eurosids
Real Rose Class
Rosids
Rosids
Rose-Like Class
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

The exact origin of the lemon has remained a mystery, though it is widely presumed that lemons first grew in India, northern Burma and China. In South and South East Asia, it was known for its antiseptic properties and it was used as antidote for various poisons. It was later introduced to Iraq and Egypt around AD 700. The lemon was first recorded in literature in a tenth century Arabic treatise on farming and was used as an ornamental plant in early Islamic gardens. It was distributed widely throughout the Arab world and the Mediterranean region between AD 1000 and AD 1150

Medicinal Uses: Lemon juice is probably the best of all antiscorbutics, being almost a specific in scurvy. English ships are required by law to carry sufficient lemon or limejuice for every seaman to have an ounce daily after being ten days at sea. Its value in this direction has been stated to be due to its vitamins.

Locally, it is a good astringent, whether as a gargle in sore throat, in pruritis of the scrotum, in uterine haemorrhage after delivery, or as a lotion in sunburn. It is said to be the best cure for severe, obstinate hiccough, and is helpful in jaundice and hysterical palpitation of the heart. The decoction has been found to be a good antiperiodic, useful as a substitute for quinine in malarial conditions, or for reducing the temperature in typhoid.

Food Uses: Lemons are used to make lemonade, and as a garnish for drinks. Many mixed drinks, soft drinks, Iced tea, and water are often served with a wedge or slice of lemon in the glass or on the rim. The average lemon contains approximately 3 tablespoons of juice. Allowing lemons to come to room temperature before squeezing (or heating briefly in a microwave) makes the juice easier to extract. Lemons left unrefrigerated for long periods of time are susceptible to mold.

Fish are marinated in lemon juice to neutralize the odor. The acid neutralizes the amines in fish by converting them into nonvolatile ammonium salts.

Other Notes: The dried flowers and leaves are used in pharmacy in France.

The roots and wood are cut in winter. The latter takes a beautiful polish and is nicely veined.

Among the lesser deities of the Buddhist pantheon we find Jambhala, a very rotund god. In one hand he holds a mangosteen, a thick-skinned, juicy fruit and in the other hand he holds a lemon.



Lemon




Lemon




Lemon


Comment: Lemon, Citrus ×limon

Page Posts: 3

MrFlores
MrFlores
June 17, 2010
Makes my mouth water.
Thunder
Thunder
June 17, 2010
About 12 hours away in Glorida....or 2 hrs away in Pennsylvania at the Longwood Garden Botanical Gardens! These pics I took at the botanical gardens this past March

gardengeek
gardengeek
June 17, 2010
That is really cool, do these grow near you?

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