Home

Plants

Tree of Life

ID
  
 
Healthy Home Gardening
 
Loquat
Rosaceae
Eriobotrya japonica


heidbenati
heidbenati
Flower Petal # 5
Main Color    
Color 2    
Type Categories Useful Parts

Tree



Rosaceae Family

Eriobotrya Genus

Location

Found in São Paulo at the farmers market. Southeastern Chinese origin.

Japan is a leading producer of loquats (January to June), followed by China (March to July). They are also grown in the Mediterranean region (for example in Cyprus, Egypt. France where they are called néfliers du Japon (http://tous-les-fruits.com/photos/lrey/photo-31.html), Israel, Italy, Albania, Lebanon, Malta, Spain, Morocco, Algeria, Portugal, Syria, and Turkey), as well as in Armenia, Abkhazia, Australia, Bermuda (where they are commonly made into jam), Brazil, India, New Zealand, and Pakistan. In Cyprus they are called mespila whereas in Greece they are called mousmoula and in Crete, in the local dialect they are called despoles. Loquats are common in Madagascar, mainly in the highlands in the middle of the country; the Malagasy name is Pibasy.This tree can also be found in Chile, Guatemala. It also grows in Mexico, Central and South America, the American South, South Crimea and Sochi.

Physical Description
The loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) is a fruit tree in the family Rosaceae, indigenous to southeastern China. It was formerly thought to be closely related to the genus Mespilus, and is still sometimes known as the Japanese medlar.

It is an evergreen large shrub or small tree, with a rounded crown, short trunk and woolly new twigs. The tree can grow to 5-10 m tall, but is often smaller, about 3-4 m.

The leaves are alternate, simple, 10-25 cm long, dark green, tough and leathery in texture, with a serrated margin, and densely velvety-hairy below with thick yellow-brown pubescence; the young leaves are also densely pubescent above, but this soon rubs off.


Loquat fruits, growing in clusters, are oval, rounded or pear-shaped, 3-5 cm long, with a smooth or downy, yellow or orange, sometimes red-blushed skin. The succulent, tangy flesh is white, yellow or orange and sweet to subacid or acid, depending on the cultivar. Each fruit contains five ovules, of which one to five mature into large brown seeds. The skin, though thin, can be peeled off manually if the fruit is ripe.


Compare Species
?

Rosaceae
Rosales
Rosales
Order of Roses
NOX Clad
Nitrogen Bean Clad
Oxid-Faba
Fabidae
Bean-Like Class
Eurosids
Real Rose Class
Rosids
Rosids
Rose-Like Class
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information


Loquats are unusual among fruit trees in that the flowers appear in the autumn or early winter, and the fruits are ripe in late winter or early spring. In Northern California, loquats bear fruit in May, while in Southern California, loquats bear fruit in April. The flowers are 2 cm diameter, white, with five petals, and produced in stiff panicles of three to ten flowers. The flowers have a sweet, heady aroma that can be smelled from a distance.

The fruits are the sweetest when soft and yellow.

The loquat is comparable with its distant relative, the apple, in many aspects, with a high sugar, acid and pectin content. It is eaten as a fresh fruit and mixes well with other fruits in fresh fruit salads or fruit cups. Firm, slightly immature fruits are best for making pies or tarts. The fruits are also commonly used to make jam, jelly, and chutney, and are often served poached in light syrup.

Loquat syrup is used in Chinese medicine for soothing the throat like a cough drop. The leaves, combined with other ingredients and known as pipa gao, it acts as a demulcent and an expectorant, as well as to soothe the digestive and respiratory systems. Loquats can also be used to make light wine.

Like most related plants, the seeds (pips) and young leaves of the plant are slightly poisonous, containing small amounts of cyanogenetic glycocides which release cyanide when digested, though the low concentration and bitter flavour normally prevents enough being eaten to cause harm.

The Loquat is a fruit of Southeastern Chinese origin. It was introduced into Japan and became naturalized there in very early times, and has been cultivated there for over 1,000 years. It has also become naturalized in India, the whole Mediterranean Basin and many other areas. Chinese immigrants are presumed to have carried the loquat to Hawaii.

The Loquat was often mentioned in ancient Chinese literature, such as the poems of Li Bai. In Portuguese literature, it is mentioned since before the Age of Discovery.

Eaten in quantity, loquats have a gentle but noticeable sedative effect, with effects lasting up to 24 hours.





Loquat
Loquat - November 09, 2009



Loquat
Loquat - August 26, 2009



Loquat
Loquat - August 26, 2009



Loquat
Loquat - August 26, 2009



Loquat
Loquat - August 26, 2009



Loquat
Loquat - August 26, 2009



Loquat
Loquat - August 26, 2009



Loquat
Loquat - August 26, 2009



Loquat
Loquat - August 26, 2009



Loquat
Loquat - August 26, 2009



Loquat
Loquat - August 26, 2009



Loquat
Loquat - August 26, 2009

Comment: Loquat, Eriobotrya japonica

Page Posts: 2

heidbenati
heidbenati
August 26, 2009
It kind had the same texture, but not the same taste. It is a bit tangy, kind sweet, and it is soft.
gardengeek
gardengeek
August 26, 2009
it looks like a pear, does it taste like one?

Look for Loquat on:
Google: Loquat Wikipedia: Loquat YouTube: Loquat
Phylogenetic Tree of Life

Learn how to create a custom
Tree of Life





© Copyright 2006 - 2018 HealthyHomeGardening.com.
All Rights Reserved.
Web Design by Artatom