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Mexican Primrose
Onagraceae
Oenothera speciosus (berlandieri) 'Rosea


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Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb

Onagraceae Family

Oenothera Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Primrose, Rose of Mexico, pinkladies, pink evening primrose, showy evening primrose, and amapola, Rosea Sundrops


Location

Native to northern Mexico and USA. This species is found growing in these states. Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia and West Virginia

Physical Description
It is only about six inches to a foot tall, but a clump can spread rhizomitously to cover increasing ground. It will regenerate from any fragment of its rhizome

The pink primrose has glaborous (smooth) to pubescent stems that grow to 50 cm in height. The pubescent leaves are alternate with very short or no petiole (sessile), reaching 10 cm long to 4 cm broad. They are variable in shape, from linear to obovate, and are toothed or wavy-edged. It produces single, four-petaled, cup-shaped flowers on the upper leaf axils. These fragrant shell-pink flowers bloom throughout the summer into early autumn. The 1.5-2" flowers start out white and grow pink as they age. The flower throats, as well as the stigmas and stamens, have a soft yellow color. It blooms both day and night, but typically in the pre-dawn hours, closing when the full sun hits them. They bloom from March to July, and occasionally in the fall.




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Onagraceae
Myrtales
Myrtales
Order of Myrtles
Malvidae
Mallow Class
Eurosids
Real Rose Class
Rosids
Rosids
Rose-Like Class
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Cultivation: Pink evening primrose will grow nicely in poor soil. Plants are late to emerge in the spring, so their locations should be marked. They may not be just where you planted them though! Evening primroses tend to be surreptitiously invasive. They send their roots far and wide during the winter when no top growth is visible, then pop up everywhere in the spring.

Propagation: Pink evening primroses are easy to grow from seed. Sow them outdoors late summer to fall or in early spring or sow indoors in early spring. The seeds can simply be scattered outdoors where they are to grow if the ground is not too hard or densely vegetated. Indoors, keep the planting medium moist and at a temperature between 68ºF (20ºC) and 86ºF (30ºC). Seedlings should appear in 2-3 weeks. Pink evening primrose also can be propagated vegetatively by dividing the root clumps in spring

Pollination: This flower is frequented by several species of insect, but moths are the most common as the flowers are mostly open at night.
Small bees collect pollen from the flowers, but are unlikely to pollinate them. The size and length of the stamens and stigma suggest that hummingbirds, large butterflies, or day-flying Sphinx moths are more likely to pollinate the flowers while seeking nectar, although I have not observed this. Like many other members of the Evening Primrose family, the foliage can be consumed by various mammalian herbivores, including rabbits, groundhogs, deer, and livestock.





Mexican Primrose




Mexican Primrose


Comment: Mexican Primrose, Oenothera speciosus (berlandieri) 'Rosea

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