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Moth Mullein
Scrophulariaceae
Verbascum blattaria L.


Thunder
Thunder
Flower Petal # 5
Main Color    
Color 2    
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb



Scrophulariaceae Family

Verbascum Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Flannel Plant, Candlewick Plant, Velvet Plant


Location

This weedy species is a native of Eurasia

Physical Description
This introduced biennial plant is 2-4' tall and either unbranched or sparingly branched. The central stem is stout, ribbed, and usually glabrous beneath the inflorescence. The basal leaves of 1st-year plants form a low-growing rosette about 8-12" across. During the second year, this species bolts upward with alternate leaves along the flowering stems. They are up to 6" long and 2½" across, becoming smaller as they ascend the stems. The leaves of these 2nd-year plants are broadly lanceolate with margins that are coarsely crenate or dentate. Sometimes the margins are slightly undulate and irregular. The lower leaves strongly clasp the stems, while the upper leaves near the inflorescence are more likely to be sessile. The upper surface of each leaf is wrinkled along the veins and hairless. The central stem and upper side stems (if any) terminate in tall spike-like racemes of flowers about ½2' in length. The stalks of these racemes are glandular hairy. Each flower spans up to 1" across, consisting of 5 spreading petals, 5 stamens, a hairy green calyx with 5 pointed lobes, and a single pistil with a green stigma. The petals are usually white or pale yellow, and they often have purplish pink or greenish brown tints on the surface facing the calyx. The center of the flower has fine purple hairs around the stamens and the base of the petals are often some shade of purple or pink. The pedicel of each flower is about ½" long, and there is a tapering green bract of about the same length at its base. The blooming period usually occurs during the summer, and lasts about 1-2 months. Each flower is replaced by a round capsule containing numerous seeds. The root system consists of a stout taproot. This plant spreads by reseeding itself


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Scrophulariaceae
Lamiales
Lamiales
Tounge Order (Mints)
Euasterids I
Euasterids I
Real Stars Group One
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Cultivation: Moth Mullein is an adaptable plant that usually grows in full sunlight, moist to dry conditions, and rather poor soil that contains gravel or clay. In dry poor soil, this plant can be rather small, while at sites with fertile soil and more moisture it can become rather large.

Propagation: This plant is easy to grow from seed and produces huge quantities of it.

Medicinal Uses: There is some evidence it may be useful as a pain-killing narcotic, but more research is needed

Other Notes: The plant repels insects, it is used indoors to repel moths and cockroaches

New England women used to pack this plant among woolen garments in summer to keep out the tiny clothes moths

The leaves of Verbascum blattaria as well as the flowers and the stalks have been used in traditional fabric dyeing. A range of possible colors can be produced by Moth mullein (also known as flannel plant, candlewick plant or velvet plant) including yellow, gold, bright yellow, moss green and dark yellow-green. Fabrics traditionally dyed with this plant include: wool, silk. (The mordants used for fixing the dye include: alum, chrome, tin.)





Moth Mullein
Flower Close up



Moth Mullein
Flower scape



Moth Mullein
Flowers



Moth Mullein
Leaves

Comment: Moth Mullein, Verbascum blattaria L.

Page Posts: 4

Thunder
Thunder
August 13, 2010
Snow ....what tribe was your Grandmother? that is very interesting...thanks


Snow

Iowa August 13, 2010
My indian Grandmother's called this "Grandmother's Flannel" They boiled the leaves for a medicinal wash if you got a cut or a rash, drank it as a steeped tea for general illness or as a relaxer and smoked the roots for chest congestion.

Thunder
Thunder
June 16, 2010
Nor did I, until coming home from picture hunting opportunies to find out what I had taken shots off!

gardengeek
gardengeek
June 16, 2010
This is really cool! I didn't know there was another Mullein.

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Google: Moth Mullein Wikipedia: Moth Mullein YouTube: Moth Mullein
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