Home

Plants

Tree of Life

ID
  
 
Healthy Home Gardening
 
Queen Anne's Lace
Apiaceae
Daucus carota


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb



Apiaceae Family

Daucus Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Wild Carrot, Bird’s Nest, Bee’s Nest, bishop's lace, Bird’s nest, Bee’s nest


Location

Native to Europe

Physical Description
Queen Anne’s Lace has feathery, finely divided leaves and a stem that rise 2-4 feet tall. The showy white flower is shaped like an umbrella and is made up of many small flowers in a lace-like pattern. At the center is a purplish-black floret. The root of Queen Anne’s Lace is thick and resembles a carrot. When in bloom, Queen Anne’s Lace looks like no other flower; without the showy white umbrella of florets, the leaves of the plant look like those of the domestic carrot and a pair of deadly relatives, poison hemlock and fool’s parsley.


Compare Species
?

Apiaceae
Apiales
Apiales
Api Order (Carrot)
Euasterids II
Euasterids II
Real Stars Group Two
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Traditionally, tea made from the root of Queen Anne’s Lace has been used as diuretic to prevent and eliminate kidney stones, and to rid individuals of worms. Its seeds have been used for centuries as a contraceptive; they were prescribed by physicians as an abortifacient, a sort of “morning after” pill. The seeds have also been used as a remedy for hangovers, and the leaves and seeds are both used to settle the gastrointestinal system. It is still used by some women today as a contraceptive; a teaspoon of seeds are thoroughly chewed, swallowed and washed down with water or juice starting just before ovulation, during ovulation, and for one week thereafter. Grated wild carrot can be used for healing external wounds and internal ulcers. The thick sap is used as a remedy for cough and congestion

Medicinal Uses: Diuretic, stimulant deobstruent. An infusion of the whole herb is considered an active and valuable remedy in the treatment of dropsy, chronic kidney diseases and affections of the bladder. The infusion, made from 1 OZ. of the herb in a pint of boiling water, is taken in wineglassful doses. Carrot tea, taken night and morning, and brewed in this manner from the whole front, is considered excellent for a gouty disposition. A strong decoction is very useful in gravel and stone, and is good against flatulence. A fluid extract is also prepared, the dose being from 1 2 to 1 drachm.

The seeds are carminative, stimulant and very useful in flatulence, windy colic, hiccough, dysentery, chronic coughs, etc. The dose of the seeds, bruised, is from one-third to one teaspoonful, repeated as necessary. They were at one time considered a valuable remedy for calculus complaints. They are excellent in obstructions of the viscera, in jaundice (for which they were formerly considered a specific), and in the beginnings of dropsy’s, and are also of service as an emmenagogue. They have a slight aromatic smell and a warm, pungent taste. They communicate an agreeable flavor to malt liquor, if infused in it while working in the vat, and render it a useful drink in scorbutic disorders.

Old writers tell us that a poultice made of the roots has been found to mitigate the pain of cancerous ulcers, and that the leaves, applied with honey, cleanse running sores and ulcers. An infusion of the root was also used as an aperient.

Food Uses: The root of Queen Anne’s Lace can be eaten as a vegetable or in soup.

Other Notes: Queen Anne’s Lace is said to have been named after Queen Anne of England, an expert lace maker. When she pricked her finger with a needle, a single drop of blood fell into the lace, thus the dark purple floret in the center of the flower. The are numerous legends about how this plant became associated with and was named after Queen Anne, wife of King James I of England.

Warning: Humans and cows have toxic reactions to eating the leaves. Symptoms include Irritation and vesication, Exposure to leaves may cause irritation to the skin in some people. Cows that have eaten large amounts of wild carrots may produce milk with an undesirable flavor.



Queen Anne's Lace




Queen Anne's Lace




Queen Anne's Lace




Queen Anne's Lace




Queen Anne\\\'s Lace
Seedhead, refered to as the Birds nest.

Comment: Queen Anne's Lace , Daucus carota

Look for Queen Anne's Lace on:
Google: Queen Anne's Lace Wikipedia: Queen Anne's Lace YouTube: Queen Anne's Lace
Phylogenetic Tree of Life

Learn how to create a custom
Tree of Life





© Copyright 2006 - 2017 HealthyHomeGardening.com.
All Rights Reserved.
Web Design by Artatom