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ID
  
 
Healthy Home Gardening
 
RedBud
Fabaceae
Cercis canadensis



Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Tree




Fabaceae Family

Cercis Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Spicewood Tree, Judas Tree


Location

Native to eastern North America From southern Ontario, Canada south to northern Florida, United States, and extends as far west as Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas.

Physical Description
Cercis canadensis L (Eastern Redbud) is a large shrub or small tree native to eastern North America from southern Ontario, Canada south to northern Florida, United States.

It typically grows to 6-9 m (20-30 feet) tall with a 8-10 m (25-35 foot) spread. It generally has a short, often twisted trunk and spreading branches. A 10-year-old tree will generally be around 5 m (15 ft) tall. The bark is dark in color, smooth, later scaly with ridges somewhat apparent, sometimes with maroon patches. The twigs are slender and zigzag, nearly black in color, spotted with lighter lenticels. The winter buds are tiny, rounded and dark red to chestnut in color. The leaves are alternate, simple, heart shaped with an entire margin, 7-12 cm (3-5 inches) long and wide, thin and papery, and may be slightly hairy below.

The flowers are showy, light to dark magenta pink in color, 1.5 cm (½ inch) long, appearing in clusters from March to May, on bare stems before the leaves, sometimes on the trunk itself. The fruit are flattened, dry, brown, pea-like pods, 5-10 cm (2-4 inches) long that contain flat, elliptical, brown seeds 6 mm (¼ inch) long, maturing in August to October


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What's This?

Fabaceae
Bean Family
Fabales
Fabales
Order of Beans
NOX Clad
Nitrogen Bean Clad
Oxid-Faba
Fabidae
Bean-Like Class
Eurosids
Real Rose Class
Rosids
Rosids
Rose-Like Class
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Early settlers sometimes used redbud blossoms as a salad food. Redbud bark was used to treat common maladies and sometimes even leukemia.

Medicinal Uses: A tea made from the inner bark is highly astringent. Used in the treatment of fevers, diarrhea and dysentery, it is also a folk remedy for leukemia. A cold infusion of the roots and inner bark have been used to treat various chest complaints including whooping cough and congestion. Bark of redbud has been used as an astringent in the treatment of dysentery

Food Uses: Flowers - raw or pickled. A nice refreshing acid taste, the flowers are rich in vitamin C and make a pleasant addition to salads. They can also be used as a condiment. The unopened buds are pickled or used as a caper substitute. On a zero moisture basis, the seed contains 22.9 - 27.5% protein, 7.7 - 8.8% fat and 3% ash. (This report does not say if the seed is edible

In some parts of southern Appalachia, green twigs from the Eastern redbud are used as seasoning for wild game such as venison and opossum.

Redbud flowers are edible, with a slightly nutty flavor. Flowers of the tree can be put into salads or fried and eaten. They can be added to pancakes or fritters or used as an attractive garnish on salads. Or you can use them to make a unique pickle relish! If you want to sample Redbud flowers, remember, as with the gathering of any wild edible, don't take all that you find. Leave plenty for the tree to produce seeds, for the insects to get nectar and pollen and for people to enjoy for their beauty.

When green and tender, the seed pods are also edible and can be cooked and served with butter just like peas. As they mature, the pods become brown and papery. They may persist on the branches until the following spring. Considering the abundance of seeds produced, it is interesting that only a few birds are known to make them a regular part of their diet.

Other Notes: The bark of young shoots is used in basket making. Wood - heavy, hard, not strong, close grained, takes a very fine polish. It weighs 40lb per cubic foot

Eastern redbud is often used as a street tree planted 25-35 ft (7.6-10.7 m) apart. They also make good framing trees for small homes. Redbud is great for providing shade for patios and for a spring accent tree. The flowers are one of the first signs of spring

State Tree of Oklahoma. The Redbud is the Wichita Arbor Day tree for 1999.

One Legend references the Red Bud as Follows:

The Native American Woman gave Seets-a' ma a beautiful bag. It was red as blood, for it was made of the flowers of the red bud tree. In this bag was the color and fragrance of the flowers, which grew on the Tree Of Light, which fell down from heaven into the Great water.

According to an Old World legend, Judas Iscariot hanged himself from a redbud tree causing the tree to blush with embarrassment, turning the normally white flowers to pink.
One reference of Native Americans using Redbud to make dye. People have used the red roots of this tree to make a dye; while the inner bark of twigs gives a mustard-yellow dye. Boiled in water, redbud twigs produce a yellow dye. (Kershaw)





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Comment: RedBud, Cercis canadensis

Page Posts: 1

gardengeek
gardengeek
March 10, 2011
Here's a great video about the Redbud:

youtube.com watch?v=uzYOBLfsVSw

Look for RedBud on:
Google: RedBud Wikipedia: RedBud YouTube: RedBud
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