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Scarlet Globemallow
Malvaceae
Sphaeralcea coccinea


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb



Malvaceae Family

Sphaeralcea Genus
Other Names for this Plant

red false mallow


Location

Native to North America: from From Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba in Canada, south and eastward to Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, and Mexico

Physical Description
Scarlet globe mallow is usually less than 12 inches tall and frequently trails on the ground. The leaves are grayish-green and are palmately lobed and then lobed again. The flowers are a unique salmon orange, but can also be light pink to brick red and are clustered in spike- like racemes on the ends of the branches. Scarlet globe mallow has deep-seated woody roots that help it survive during times of drought.


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Malvaceae
Malvales
Malvales
Order of Mallows
Eumalvids
Real Mallows
Malvidae
Mallow Class
Eurosids
Real Rose Class
Rosids
Rosids
Rose-Like Class
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Scarlet globemallow, a member of the mallow family (Malvaceae) was collected by Meriwether Lewis on July 20, 1806 along the Marias River in present-day Toole County.

Medicinal Uses: Blackfoot Indians chewed these plants and applied the paste to burns, scalds, and external sores as a cooling agent.

The roots were used to stop bleeding, and they were also chewed to reduce hunger when food was scarce. The leaves are slimy and mucilaginous when crushed, and they were chewed or mashed and used as poultices or plasters on inflamed skin, sores, wounds and sore or blistered feet. Leaves were also used in lotions to relieve skin diseases, or they were dried, ground, and dusted on sores. Fresh leaves and flowers were chewed to relieve hoarse or sore throats and upset stomachs. Whole plants were used to make a sweet-tasting tea that made distasteful medicines more palatable. It was also said to reduce swellings, improve appetite, relieve upset stomachs, and strengthen voices. The Dakota heyoka chewed the plants to a paste and rubbed it on their skin as protection from scalding.

It was used for various medicinal purposes by a number of tribes. Many of the uses involved various preparations of the plant for skin problems such as sores, burns, swellings and bleeding. It was also used to reduce pain.

Food Uses: American Indians seem to have used it mainly as emergency rations by chewing the roots during food shortages



Scarlet Globemallow




Scarlet Globemallow




Scarlet Globemallow




Scarlet Globemallow


Comment: Scarlet Globemallow, Sphaeralcea coccinea

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