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Spotted Jewelweed
Balsaminaceae
Impatiens capensis


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb



Balsaminaceae Family

Impatiens Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Common Jewelweed, Touch-me-not. Lady's-earrings, Orange Balsam, Snapweed, Quick-in-the-hand


Location

Native to North America from Newfoundland to Saskatchewan. Naturalized in Britain. And all though the East part of the USA

Physical Description
The flowers are orange with a three-lobed corolla; one of the calyx lobes is colored similarly to the corolla and forms a hooked conical spur at the back of the flower. The stems are somewhat translucent, succulent and have swollen or darkened nodes. The seed pods are pendant and have projectile seeds that explode out of the pods when they are lightly touched, if ripe, which is where the name touch-me-not comes from


Compare Species
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Balsaminaceae
Ericales
Ericales
Erica Order (Heathers)
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

The Jewelweed plant has been used for centuries in North America by Native Americans and Herbalists, as a natural preventative and treatment for poison ivy and poison oak; and is a folk remedy for many other skin disorders.

Jewelweed has long been recognized as an herbal remedy for the treatment of topical irritation. The juice (sap) of the jewelweed has been used by Native Americans, particularly those living in Appalachia, as a prophylactic against poison ivy rash and as a treatment after the eruptions have occurred. Jewelweed extracts are not generally found in commercial topical products.

Medical Uses: Cherokee Drug (Ceremonial Medicine)

Used as an ingredient in green corn medicine; (Gynecological Aid)

Decoction of stems taken to ease childbirth; (Misc. Disease Remedy)

Infusion of leaf taken for measles; (Pediatric Aid)

Infusion of root used for babies with "bold hives" and leaves used for "child's sour stomach."
Iroquois Drug (Dermatological Aid)

Compound decoction of plants taken and used as a wash for liverspots; (Diuretic)

Infusion of roots taken to increase urination; (Eye Medicine)

Poultice of smashed stems applied to sore or raw eyelids; (Febrifuge)

Cold infusion of plants taken for fevers.

Meskwaki Drug (Dermatological Aid) Poultice of fresh plant applied to sores and juice used for nettle stings; (Liver Aid) Infusion of leaves used for jaundice

Mohegan Drug (Burn Dressing)

Compound of balsam buds and rum used as ointment for burns; (Burn Dressing)

Poultice of crushed buds applied to burns; (Dermatological Aid) Compound of balsam buds and rum used as ointment for cuts

Ojibwa Drug (Analgesic) Juice of fresh plant rubbed on head for headache.

Potawatomi Drug (Analgesic) Infusion of whole plant taken for stomach cramps and used as a liniment for soreness; (Gastrointestinal Aid) Infusion of whole plant taken for stomach cramps; (Pulmonary Aid) Infusion of whole plant taken for chest cold

Jewelweed tea is sometimes used to treat poison ivy dermatitis.

Antidote; Poultice; Stings; Warts.

Jewelweed was commonly used as a medicinal herb by a number of native North American Indian tribes, and has been widely used in domestic medicine. Its main value lies in its external application for wounds and a range of skin complaints. However, it is little used in modern herbalism and is considered to be dangerous and 'wholly questionable' when used internally.
The herb is antidote, cathartic, diuretic and emetic. An infusion has been used in the treatment of fevers, difficult urination, measles, stomach cramps, jaundice etc.
The juice of the leaves is used externally in the treatment of piles, fungal dermatitis, nettle stings, poison ivy rash, burns etc.
The sap is used to remove warts.
A poultice of the leaves is applied to bruises, burns, cuts etc
Has also been used to treat athletes foot

Food Uses: Leaves; Seed; Stem.

The succulent stems, whilst still young and tender, can be cut up and cooked like green beans.

Young leaves and shoots - cooked. They contain calcium oxalate crystals. Calcium oxalate is usually destroyed by thorough cooking. Large quantities of the leaves are purgative. The young shoots can be boiled in 2 changes of water and eaten as a cooked green

Other Notes: The fresh juice obtained from the plant is a fungicide. This juice can be concentrated by boiling it.

A yellow dye has been made from the flowers. It can be made from the whole plant. Menominee Dye (Orange-Yellow) Whole plant used to make an orange yellow dye.

Ojibwa Dye (Yellow) Whole plant used to make a yellow dye, the material boiled in the mixture with rusty nails.

Warning: Due to the presence of Calcium oxalate crystals it is recommended that this plant be used on an external basis. Large quantities of the leaves are purgative. Calcium oxalate is usually destroyed by thorough cooking.



Spotted Jewelweed




Spotted Jewelweed




Spotted Jewelweed


Comment: Spotted Jewelweed, Impatiens capensis

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