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Tobacco
Solanaceae
Nicotiana tabacum


Thunder
Thunder
Type Categories Useful Parts

Herb



Solanaceae Family

Nicotiana Genus
Other Names for this Plant

Fumo, Petume, Petina, Pitura, etum, Tabaco (Brazil), Tabaco (Argentina)


Location

Origin & Range: South America. N. tabacum is a native of tropical and subtropical America but it is now commercially cultivated worldwide.



Physical Description
This is an annual herb, with a long, fibrous root, and an erect, round, hairy, viscid stem, branched toward the top, and from 4 to 6 feet in height. The alternate leaves are sessile, ovate or lanceolate, acuminate, decurrent, viscid, pale green, 1 or 2 feet long, and 6 or 8 inches broad. The under surface of the tobacco leaf is marked by a prominent, thick midrib, sending off, at acute angles, lateral veins, which terminate near the margin of the leaf in a curved manner. The flowers are rose-colored, and produced in panicles at the ends of the stems and branches. The bracts are linear and acute. The calyx is urceolate, hairy, glutinous, half as long as the corolla, and ends in 5 acute segments. Corolla funnel-shaped, swelling toward the top, the border dull-red, expanding, with 5 acute, crimped lobes. Stamens 5; filaments inclined to one side, with oblong anthers. Ovary ovate; style long and slender; stigma capitate and cloven. Capsule ovate, invested with the calyx, 2-celled, 2-valved, but opening crosswise at top, and loculicidal. The seeds are very numerous, small, somewhat reniform, and attached to a fleshy receptacle


Compare Species
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Solanaceae
Nightshade Family
Solanales
Solanales
Nightshade Order
Euasterids I
Euasterids I
Real Stars Group One
Asteridae
Asteridae
Class of Stars (Daisies)
Core Eudicots
Core Eudicots
Main, Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Eudicots
Eudicots
Real, Two First-Leaves (Dicots)
Mesangiospermae
Mesangiospermae
Half Capsule Seed Division
Magnoliophyta
Magnoliophyta
Magnolia Division
Spermatophytes
Spermatophytes
Seed Plants
Euphyllophytina
Real Land Plants
Polysporangiates
Multiple Spore Sub-Kingdom
Stomatophytes
Stomatophytes
Air Pores Sub-Kingdom
Embryophytes
Embryophytes
Multicellular Land Plants
Streptobionta
Streptobionta
Multicellular Plants
Plantae
Plantae
Plants
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
Cells with a Nucleus


General Information

Nicotia'na: named for Jean Nicot (1530-1600), French ambassador to Portugal and the person supposedly responsible for introducing tobacco into France about 1560, also author of one of the first French language dictionaries
Tobacco is a native of the warmer parts of America, and was first exported to England, in 1586, by Sir Walter Raleigh. According to the authors of the Pharmacographia, it was carried to Europe by the Spaniards on their return from discovering America (1492), and employed for its medicinal effects. At present, it is raised in many parts of the world, and especially in the middle states of this country. The strongest and more commonly used tobacco is raised in Virginia, but the Cuban or Havana leaf is preferred by smokers
Tobacco has a long history of use by medical herbalists as a relaxant, though since it is a highly additive drug it is seldom employed internally or externally at present.
The leaves are antispasmodic, discutient, diuretic, emetic, expectorant, irritant, narcotic, sedative, and sialagogue. They are used externally in the treatment of rheumatic swelling, skin diseases, and scorpion stings. The plant should be used with great caution, when taken internally it is an addictive narcotic. The active ingredients can also be absorbed through the skin.
A protein can be extracted from the leaves. It is an odorless, tasteless white powder and can be added to cereal grains, vegetables, soft drinks, and other foods. It can be whipped like egg whites, liquefied, or gelled and can take on the flavor and texture of a variety of foods.
Shows toxicity to humans, horses, and pets due to Nicotine alkaloid with the following symptoms: Symptoms following a relatively small dose are transient and consist of salivation, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, bradycardia, and dizziness



Tobacco
Tobacco Flowers



Tobacco
Entire plant showing growth pattern



Tobacco
Leaf

Comment: Tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum

Page Posts: 1

gardengeek
gardengeek
June 14, 2010
This is great, I've been trying to get pictures of Tobacco for the past year. Looks like a Datura flower.

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