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1

5866
cmgfour
cmgfour
  June 19, 2012
This fungus was found on my French Hollyhock and grape leaves. Under the microscope it looks raised with hundreds of white fungus tentacles coming fromt he center outward.
2

7651
gardengeek
gardengeek
Nipple Galls
  Nipple Galls June 30, 2010
Nipple Galls
3

12020
gardengeek
gardengeek
Red Fungus Disease
  Red Fungus Disease June 30, 2010
Red Fungus Disease
4

10474
Thunder
Thunder
Fusarium Wilt
  Fusarium Wilt June 26, 2010
Disease fungi (Fusarium oxysporum) enter through the roots and interfere with the water conducting vessels of the plant. As the infection spreads up into the stems and leaves it restricts water flow, causing the foliage to wilt and turn yellow. Symptoms often appear later in the growing season and are first noticed on the lower (older) leaves. As the disease progresses, the younger leaves will also be affected and the plant eventually dies. In many cases, only one branch or side of the plant sho Fusarium Wilt
5

10736
gardengeek
gardengeek
Red Spot Rust
  Red Spot Rust June 14, 2010
Red Spot Rust
6

6882
DRaley
DRaley
  June 04, 2010
My yellow straight neck squash plant has been healthy and producing. Today when I examined my garden this plant was wilted and curled with these huge ugly fungus growths all over the base of the plant. I do not know what this is or where it came from, I planted this garden 8 weeks ago and have had no problems.
7

19032
heidbenati
heidbenati
Cercospora Leaf Spot, Narrow Brown Leaf Spot
  Cercospora Leaf Spot, Narrow Brown Leaf Spot October 25, 2009
Hydrangea macrophylla Plant infected with Cercospora Leaf Spot. Cercospora Leaf Spot is a common disease in landscaping planting of Hydrangea. It is usually seen in low-maintenance landscaping. It will unlikely kill the plant but will show many spots and leafs will shed prematurely. The fungus will likely spread to other healthy leaves by splashing water from the leaves that have fallen. Systematic position Division Eumycota, s Cercospora Leaf Spot, Narrow Brown Leaf Spot
8

6019
Jenny_Smith
Jenny_Smith
Corn smut
  Corn smut May 03, 2009
Corn smut is a disease of maize caused by the pathogenic plant fungus Ustilago maydis. In Mexico corn smut is called huitlacoche, sometimes spelled cuitlacoche), a Nahuatl word reportedly meaning raven's excrement. It is considered a delicacy, even being preserved and sold for a higher price than corn. For culinary use, the galls are harvested while still immature fully mature galls are dry and almost entirely spore-filled. The immature galls, gathered two to three weeks after an e Corn smut
9

9332
genny_happy
genny_happy
Early blight
  Early blight April 24, 2009
Alternaria solani is a fungal pathogen, producing a disease in tomato and potato plants called early blight. It produces small, darkened lesions on the plants, that spread into growing black spots of dead tissue, often killing most of the plant in the long run. Seeds infected with the disease may even damp off during germination. This disease can be prevented with some fungicides, including azoxystrobin, potassium bicarbonate, hydrogen dioxide as well as the biological control agent Bacillus Early blight
10

11694
heidbenati
heidbenati
White rot root disease - Honey fungus or Armillaria
  White rot root disease - Honey fungus or Armillaria April 23, 2009
Honey fungus or Armillaria is a genus of parasitic fungi that live on trees and woody shrubs. It includes about 10 species formerly lumped together as A. mellea. Armillaria is long lived and form some of the largest living organisms in the world. The largest single organism (of the species Armillaria ostoyae) covers more than 3.4 square miles (8.9 km²) and is thousands of years old. Some species of Armillaria are bioluminescent and may be responsible for the phenomena known as foxfire and White rot root disease - Honey fungus or Armillaria
11

20257
heidbenati
heidbenati
Powdery mildew
  Powdery mildew April 23, 2009
Powdery mildew is a fungal disease that affects a wide range of plants. Powdery mildew diseases are caused by many different species of fungi in the order Erysiphales. It is one of the easier diseases to spot, as its symptoms are quite distinctive. Infected plants display white powder-like spots on the leaves and stems. The lower leaves are the most affected, but the mildew can appear on any part of the plant that shows above the ground. As the disease progresses, the spots get larger and thick Powdery mildew
12

3591
Jenny_Smith
Jenny_Smith
Brown Patch
  Brown Patch March 18, 2009
Rhizoctonia solani (teleomorph: Thanatephorus cucumeris) is a plant pathogenic fungus with a wide host range and worldwide distribution. It is one cause of the condition known as damping off, which is a cause of death of seedlings in agriculture. It is also responsible for wire stem, a disease of cabbage, cauliflower and related plants that is similar to damping-off but attacks older seedlings and produces a constricted, wiry stem. The most favorable conditions for disease development usua Brown Patch
13

4421
Jenny_Smith
Jenny_Smith
 Dollar Spot
  Dollar Spot March 18, 2009
The disease is caused by the fungus Sclerotinia homoeocarpa. Susceptible turfgrass include: all species of warm- and cool-season turfgrass. Tall fescues, Bentgrass, Zoysiagrass and Bermuda hybrids are particularly susceptible. Dollar spot is favored by temperatures between 60F to 85F and continuous high humidity and low soil moisture. This disease is particularly favored by warm days, cool nights, and intense dews. It also infects areas with low levels of nitrogen and becomes more severe in  Dollar Spot
14

3575
Jenny_Smith
Jenny_Smith
Dogwood anthracnose
  Dogwood anthracnose March 18, 2009
Dogwood anthracnose is caused by the fungus Discula. Brown, elliptical cankers may form at the base of dead branches. Drought, winter injury, and environmental stress predispose dogwood to anthracnose. Kousa dogwood (Cornus kousa) is resistant to this disease. Dogwood anthracnose
15

3630
Jenny_Smith
Jenny_Smith
Cedar-Apple and Quince Rusts
  Cedar-Apple and Quince Rusts March 18, 2009
Cedar-apple rust and quince rust affect two groups of vastly utilized landscape plants. The cedar-apple rust fungus overwinters in galls that may grow to several inches in diameter on eastern red cedar and several other junipers. In the spring, brightly-colored, gelatinous horns emerge from the galls during wet weather. These horns consist of masses of spores that are spread by wind to newly-emerging apple, crabapple, and hawthorn leaves and fruit. By mid-summer, rusty or orange-colored spots ap Cedar-Apple and Quince Rusts
16

6611
Jenny_Smith
Jenny_Smith
Camellia Leaf Gall
  Camellia Leaf Gall March 18, 2009
The disease is caused by the fungus Exobasidium camelliae. The severity of the disease varies according to the weather conditions when leaf expansion begins in the spring. Cool, moist weather favors disease development. Frequently overhead sprinkler irrigation provides the moisture necessary for disease development. The fungus survives during the winter in leaf buds and infects the developing leaf tissue. Instead of developing normally, the new leaves become thickened and succulent and may b Camellia Leaf Gall
17

4508
Jenny_Smith
Jenny_Smith
Azalea Leaf and Flower Gall
  Azalea Leaf and Flower Gall March 17, 2009
The disease will cause pale green, pink white or brown fleshy galls, which are caused by the fungus Exobasidium vaccinii. Exobasidium vaccinii also infects species of Vaccinium including cranberries where it produces bright red, swollen spots on the leaves and fruits. Infected stems become thickened. Azalea Leaf and Flower Gall
18

4329
fadinha_green
fadinha_green
Phomopsis Tip Blight of Juniper
  Phomopsis Tip Blight of Juniper March 14, 2009
For most people, the first symptom noticed in the spring (early summer) is the die-back of the new shoot growth (tip blight). The new growth changes from light yellow green to red brown to ash gray as it dies from this fungal disease. Phomopsis juniperovora only kills the new growth - if more than just the new growth is killed, other fungal diseases or environmental injury is involved. Infection starts on immature scale leaves or needles, whereas mature needles are resistant. This infection prog Phomopsis Tip Blight of Juniper
19

4678
fadinha_green
fadinha_green
Anthracnose - A Fungal Disease of Shade Trees
  Anthracnose - A Fungal Disease of Shade Trees March 14, 2009
Plant disease of warm humid areas, caused by a fungus (usually Colletotrichum or Gloeosporium). It infects various plants, from trees to grasses. Symptoms include sunken spots of various colours in leaves, stems, fruits, or flowers, often leading to wilting and dying of tissues. Dogwood anthracnose, caused by the fungus Discula destructiva, thrives in cool climates; in the U.S. it has caused severe losses to natural stands of dogwoods in mountainous regions. It is controlled by destroying diseas Anthracnose - A Fungal Disease of Shade Trees




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